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Nigel Farage’s EU election tour takes him to the TOWIE Sugar Hut nightclub

Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party bandwagon has pitched up at the Essex nightclub loved by TOWIE’s stars as a new poll made him more popular than Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn.

Mr Farage spoke to crowds in a Merthyr Tydfil car park last night and today he addressed crowds at the Sugar Hut in Brentwood including club owner Mick Norcross and boxer Dereck ‘Del Boy’ Chisora.    

He told the crowded room: ‘The Only Way Is Brexit’ and revealed his party is starting to select general election candidates as they are expected to clean up at the European elections next Thursday.

And today as the Brexit carnage poured down on Labour and the Conservatives, new YouGov revealed that the public like Mr Farage more than the two main party leaders. 

Nigel Farage poses for a selfie during a Brexit Party campaign event at the Sugar Hut nightclub loved by TOWIE’S stars

Mr Farage signs a placard for Brexit Party supporters at the Brentwood nightspot

Mr Farage signs a placard for Brexit Party supporters at the Brentwood nightspot

The Brexit Party leader laughs as boxer Derek Chisora pins on his rosette outside the Sugar Hut

The Brexit Party leader laughs as boxer Derek Chisora pins on his rosette outside the Sugar Hut

Nigel Farage is now seen more favourably than Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn among voters

Nigel Farage is now seen more favourably than Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn among voters

Theresa May’s net favourability score has slumped from -39 in late March to a new all-time low of -49.

But her main rival Jeremy Corbyn is still liked less at -50, marginally better than his score of -53 in March, which was itself his own all-time low.

May and Corbyn’s scores make the two party leaders less popular than Nigel Farage with the Brexit Party leader having a net favourability score of -39. The least unpopular party leader is Change UK’s Heidi Allen, with a net favourability score of -11. Lib Dem Sir Vince Cable sits on -18. 

The Brexit Party founder Mick Norcross ahead of next week’s European elections.

Boxer Dereck Chisora was among the crowd, which also included many international media representatives.

Mr Farage said: ‘I thought if we won the Brexit battle our politicians would simply have to deliver it.

‘I’ve now learnt that this battle is about far more than Brexit, this battle actually is about democracy.

‘It’s about whether we are a democratic nation, it’s about whether we have a bond of trust between us and those that govern us, it’s about how the rest of the world looks at us.

‘We used to be an admired country. This Prime Minister and our Parliament have turned us into a laughing stock.’

Asked by a journalist whether he thought the top rate of tax should be 45% or if that is too high, he said: ‘We’ll deal with that in our manifesto when we’ve won the European elections on the issues of trust and democracy.’   

Brexit Party chairman Richard Tice with club owner Mick Norcross, who is no longer on TOWIE

Brexit Party chairman Richard Tice with club owner Mick Norcross, who is no longer on TOWIE

Amy Childs at Sugar Hut in Brentwood,

Lauren Pope at the Sugar Hut on Halloween

But his club is the favoured nightspot for TOWIE stars past and present including Amy Childs and Lauren Pope

No trendy ad agencies required! How the Brexit Party devised its clever arrow logo in-house by ‘knocking a few ideas around’ (and it cost nothing)

The Brexit Party’s logo guiding people towards their ballot paper box didn’t cost them a penny because it was done in-house, MailOnline can reveal today. 

The symbol of Nigel Farage’s movement is a forward-pointing arrow with the party’s name written inside and will win them more votes next week, an award-winning British designer has said.

With May 23 ballot papers now printed, this arrow points towards the box where Brexit Party voters will draw their cross and could help swing the EU elections, it has been claimed.   

Ben Terrett, who won a British design of the year award in 2013, said: ‘That’s going to get a lot of Xs. A helluva lot of Xs. They are a single issue, probably single election party, and this is a very clever piece of graphic design.’

He added: ‘I hate Brexit. I hate Farage even more. I just voted in the Euro elections (postal) and here’s a thing: It’s a massive arrow pointing at the box where you mark your X with the word BREXIT written in big font’. 

MailOnline understands that the Brexit Party didn’t employ an expensive design agency to create the logo, instead one of Mr Farage’s aides drew it up, saving the party up to £50,000, which the Tories paid for a redesign.

A source close to Mr Farage said: ‘The team knocked a few ideas around. We also considered black and white as an option before rejecting it for the blue logo’. 

On this postal ballot paper the Brexit Party logo appears to guide voters to mark their cross next to Nigel Farage’s party. A British designer said it was a ‘very clever piece of design’

Farage shows off the party logo during a rally in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, on Wednesday ahead of next week's European Parliament elections

Farage shows off the party logo during a rally in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales, on Wednesday ahead of next week’s European Parliament elections 

Remainers have complained that the Electoral Commission should have banned it and have even started an online petition – but Brexiteers hit back by saying that official 2016 referendum literature on how to vote showed a pencil hovering over the Remain box. 

The Electoral Commission told MailOnline today that the logo is legal and its experts don’t accept claims it will ‘mislead a voter’.

A spokesman said: ‘The emblem directs voters to the correct place to cast their vote for the party and does not encourage or discourage voters from casting their vote for other parties, or in any other way not to cast their vote correctly’.

He also contrasted it with the Change UK logo which has been widely ridiculed. 

The breakaway group’s emblem features four horizontal bars, with the party’s name on the right – although the layout of those words has been altered. 

Brexiteers hit back by pointing out this official paperwork from the 2016 referendum, which showed the pencil

Brexiteers hit back by pointing out this official paperwork from the 2016 referendum, which showed the pencil 

An earlier version of the Change UK logo was rejected by the Electoral Commission last month. 

That symbol showed the letters TIG for The Independent Group with #Change underneath. 

But the Electoral Commission said it was ‘likely to mislead voters’ and was unhappy with the use of an hashtag with clear links to online content.

The party also faced a row over its name as petition group Change.org suggested the rebel Tory and Labour MPs had chosen a title too similar to theirs.   

Polls have shown Mr Farage’s party with a strong chance of victory in the May 23 European elections. 

As Mr Terrett’s post indicates, some voters have already begun sending in postal ballots. 

Nigel Farage (left) and a Brexit Party MEP candidate for Wales, Nathan Gill (right), react as they visit an e-cigarette and vape shop in South Wales yesterday

Nigel Farage (left) and a Brexit Party MEP candidate for Wales, Nathan Gill (right), react as they visit an e-cigarette and vape shop in South Wales yesterday

Change UK had this logo banned because it used a hashtag, the Electoral Commission said

Change UK had this logo banned because it used a hashtag, the Electoral Commission said

The logo of breakaway group Change UK (pictured) has been widely ridiculed

The logo of breakaway group Change UK (pictured) has been widely ridiculed 

Some surveys have shown the Conservatives falling as low as fifth amid voter fury over the protracted Brexit process. 

The elections were never supposed to happen at all but the Brexit delay until October 31 has forced Britain to take part in the continent-wide poll. 

Change UK has made less of an impact, ranging between one and seven per cent in recent polls. 

The party faced a further blow when its lead candidate in Scotland dropped out and backed the Liberal Democrats. 

David Macdonald said a ‘diluted’ Remain vote could give Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party the chance to get an MEP in Scotland.

Change UK spokesman Chuka Umuna said it was a ‘disappointing’ move.  

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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