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Nigella Lawson warns ‘obscene overindulgence’ at Christmas leaves you looking like a ‘bloated wreck’

Nigella Lawson warns ‘obscene overindulgence’ this Christmas will leave you looking like a ‘bloated wreck’ – as she reveals the one thing she’d get rid of

Nigella Lawson today warned Brits that ‘obscene overindulgence’ during Christmas will leave them feeling like a ‘bloated wreck’. 

The celebrity cook, 62, said she never serves starters at festive meals because they seem ‘a madness’ when eating so much food on the day.

Nigella — who last week divided the internet with her festive breakfast trifle — said people can go past the point of finding eating ‘pleasurable’ when they meet up for the occasion.

But she encouraged people to enjoy ‘celebrating food with your family’.

Nigella Lawson today warned Brits that ‘obscene overindulgence’ during Christmas will leave you feeling like a ‘bloated wreck’

Speaking on The News Agents podcast, she told hosts Emily Maitlis and Jon Sopel that people should ditch starters before a festive feast.

She said: ‘I don’t know why people do starters for Christmas lunch. I never have, that seems a madness.

‘But I also think there is a way in which for many people it does become a sort of obscene overindulgence. So, people are not eating because it is pleasurable. 

‘They’re eating because somehow people feel it is when they should be eating non-stop and picking at things non-stop.’ 

Asked if people ate too much because of ‘greed and gluttony’, she said: ‘Yes, but they can go too far too.

‘You want to feel full up and grateful that you feel full up, but you don’t want to be a bloated wreck.’

Nigella also revealed she won’t be giving Christmas presents this year.

She said: ‘Celebrating food with your family is something we all, if we can do, should do it and do it gratefully. 

‘But I certainly feel I am not interested in this year buying people who don’t need things presents.

‘You can give them a card to say I’ve donated in your name in lieu of a Christmas present, so you can feel like you’re doing something.

‘You want to celebrate being with your family in ways that we haven’t been able to, but you don’t want it to tip into the obscene.’

While overeating is never recommended, experts told MailOnline traditional Christmas dinners are actually often some of the healthiest meals people eat all year.

Dr Duane Mellor, a nutritionist at Aston University, said: ‘Some of the healthiest parts of the Christmas dinner when we look at the plate are the different vegetables.

‘It can be one of the few times a year when some people eat three or more different vegetables, not including potatoes, at one meal — perhaps a good habit we could try more often. 

‘Perhaps the healthiest thing about the traditional Christmas meal that can’t be found on the plate, is that it is often shared with other people, reminding us that it is good to take time to eat with others and socialising is important for our health and wellbeing.’

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WHAT SHOULD A BALANCED DIET LOOK LIKE? 

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally wholegrain, according to the NHS

Meals should be based on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally wholegrain, according to the NHS

• Eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day. All fresh, frozen, dried and canned fruit and vegetables count

• Base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates, ideally wholegrain

• 30 grams of fibre a day: This is the same as eating all of the following: 5 portions of fruit and vegetables, 2 whole-wheat cereal biscuits, 2 thick slices of wholemeal bread and large baked potato with the skin on

• Have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks) choosing lower fat and lower sugar options

• Eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 portions of fish every week, one of which should be oily)

• Choose unsaturated oils and spreads and consuming in small amounts

• Drink 6-8 cups/glasses of water a day

• Adults should have less than 6g of salt and 20g of saturated fat for women or 30g for men a day

Source: NHS Eatwell Guide  



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