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Notorious Bondi hoarder house is pulled from auction for third time after cleaning costs are paid

The auction of a notorious hoarder’s property has once again been cancelled at the eleventh hour.

For the third time in a matter of years, the junk-filled house on Boonara Avenue in Bondi, Sydney, escaped auction on Tuesday after clean-up costs were paid at the last minute.  

Owner of the property, hoarder Mary Bobolas, managed to pay the $248,000 clean-up bill in full, forcing the NSW Sheriff to cancel Thursday’s auction.

 

The trash filled home (pictured) in the sought after street in Bondi is riddled with discarded rubbish

For the third time in a matter of years, the junk-filled house on Boonara Avenue in Bondi escaped auction after clean-up costs were paid at the last minute

For the third time in a matter of years, the junk-filled house on Boonara Avenue in Bondi escaped auction after clean-up costs were paid at the last minute

The home has created national headlines as the hoarder property sits in one of the most sought after suburbs in New South Wales, minutes walk from the beach, cafes and shops

The home has created national headlines as the hoarder property sits in one of the most sought after suburbs in New South Wales, minutes walk from the beach, cafes and shops

The Bobolas family and Waverly Council have locked heads over the property for more than 20 years

The Bobolas family and Waverly Council have locked heads over the property for more than 20 years

Selling agent principle from Raine & Horne Double Bay, Ric Serrao, said he was surprised the auction was called off.

‘I thought it was going to happen this time because there was sufficient pressure to get this issue resolved and on Monday morning the Sheriff’s office called to say it was all going ahead,’ Mr Serrao told Domain.

‘But at 5.30 last night they emailed to say the debt had been paid in full,’ he continued.

The home previously made national headlines, not for its beach views, but for the towering piles of rubbish that sit outside the hoarder property on one of the most sought after streets in New South Wales.

Locals and the neighbours are fed up having to live with the smell that is emitted from the trash-ridden home and the rats that come with it

Locals and the neighbours are fed up having to live with the smell that is emitted from the trash-ridden home and the rats that come with it

The Bobolas have cited mental health issues for why their property is immediately filled with discarded trash after each council clean-up

The Bobolas have cited mental health issues for why their property is immediately filled with discarded trash after each council clean-up

The Bobolas family and Waverly Council have locked heads over the property for more than 20 years, with neighbours having to live with the smell that is emitted from the trash-ridden home and the rats that come with it.

The Bobolas have cited mental health issues for why their property is immediately filled with discarded trash after each council clean-up.  

Waverley Council General Manager Ross McLeod told Domain he’s tried to connect the Bobolas family with support services, but the assistance has been constantly rejected. 

‘We understand how difficult and frustrating this matter has been for neighbouring residents,’ he said. 

‘The council has conducted numerous clean-ups at the property over the past 20 or so years, and we cannot expect ratepayers to continually foot the bill.’

Mary Bobolas (pictured left) managed to pay the $248,000 clean-up bill in full, forcing the NSW Sheriff to cancel the Thursday’s auction. Liana Bobolas (pictured right) is often seen sitting out the front guarding the trash

In 2016, the family faced eviction as they failed to pay yet another clean-up fee, but it was called off just hours before auction when the Bobolas family showed up with with bags full of cash.

At that time, the property was to be sold for $1.8 million, which included all the rubbish that was left at the home.

Ms Bobolas bought the 550 square metre property in 1973 for just $15,000, but due to the amount of rubbish that now lines the home, she and her daughters Elena and Liana are no longer able to live in it.

More than $350,000 of ratepayers money has been spent on 15 council clean-ups in a bid to control the piles of rubbish and each time the property is cleaned.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk