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NRL is set take charge of all disciplinary matters following a spate of scandals  

NRL is set to ban clubs from disciplining their players and take charge of all disciplinary matters following a spate of scandals

  • The NRL will table a new policy where it will take charge of disciplining players  
  • Under current systems the 16 NRL clubs hand down punishments themselves 
  • The plan will be discussed at a meeting with the ARL commission on Thursday  

The NRL is set to take responsibility for disciplining players whose off-field behaviour has brought the game into disrepute.

Currently it is up to each of the 16 clubs to decide on penalties for their players. The punishments are then signed off on by the NRL Integrity Unit.

However, after the string of scandals that continue to plague the league, chief executive Todd Greenberg is reportedly preparing a new policy that would give the Integrity Unit powers to hand down punishments instead of clubs.

The NRL is set to take responsibility for disciplining players whose off-field behaviour has brought the game into disrepute (pictured; Dylan Napa who was involved in a WhatApp scandal) 

The commission is also expected to hand down a revised disciplinary code of conduct policy that would enable the organisation to suspend St George-Illawarra's Jack de Belin (pictured) while he faces court over aggravated sexual assault charges to which he has plead not guilty 

The commission is also expected to hand down a revised disciplinary code of conduct policy that would enable the organisation to suspend St George-Illawarra’s Jack de Belin (pictured) while he faces court over aggravated sexual assault charges to which he has plead not guilty 

The theory behind the clubs disciplining their own players is that they have a better understanding of their recruit’s backgrounds and personalities.

After 12 off-field behaviour cases in the last six months, however, there is pressure for the league to take action amid claims of inconsistency in punishments across the league.

The penalties enforced range from further education and fines to suspensions.

Some claim this could result in conflicts of interest.

‘If it’s up to the clubs to stand their player down or suspend him prior to the finals for falling foul off the field, the club won’t do it,’ Canberra Raiders chairman Dr Allan Hawke told The Daily Telegraph.

‘It’s time the NRL takes everything out of the hands of the clubs and the whole disciplinary procedure sites with the NRL integrity unit,’ he said.

Mr Greenberg is expected to discuss the new policy with the Australian Rugby League Commission on Thursday.

The commission is also expected to hand down a revised disciplinary code of conduct policy that would enable the organisation to suspend St George-Illawarra’s Jack de Belin while he faces court over aggravated sexual assault charges to which he has plead not guilty.

Following a decision on that matter, Greenberg is then expected to deal with several other incidents including whether Canterbury’s Dylan Napa should be suspended over crude WhatsApp messages that went viral.

Greenberg wants the matters dealt with before the 2019 season launches on March 7 so the focus can be brought back to the game rather than the seemingly endless parade of off-field scandals. 

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg (pictured) wants the matters dealt with before the 2019 season launches on March 7 so the focus can be brought back to the game rather than the seemingly endless parade of off-field scandals 

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg (pictured) wants the matters dealt with before the 2019 season launches on March 7 so the focus can be brought back to the game rather than the seemingly endless parade of off-field scandals      

 

 

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