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NSW geography teacher Monica Young begged teenage boy, 14, to send naked photos

A 24-year-old teacher’s sexual abuse of her 14-year-old male student has been laid bare by her messages to the boy – begging him for sex in classrooms, her car and even the school’s staircase as a ‘farewell’ present. 

Monica Elizabeth Young, 24, is facing 12 years in prison after pleading guilty to three counts of aggravated sexual intercourse with a minor.

Young initiated contact with the boy on Snapchat, sending him a message which asked him to ‘send pics’ in exchange for provocative photos of herself, the NSW District Court’s agreed set of facts reveal.   

She would also FaceTime the year nine student as she performed sex acts on herself.  

Her lawyer, former prosecutor Margaret Cunneen SC, told Downing Centre District Court on Thursday it was ‘unusual’ for women in the position of trust of a school teacher to be charged with such offences. 

Young struck up a relationship with a boy who she taught six times a fortnight in geography, PDHPE and science when they began communicating closely because of the Covid lockdown which shut the school.

Young sported a slimmed down figure and wore all black when she appeared in court on Thursday, tearfully begging her victim’s family for forgiveness

They pair first began communicating on Instagram, but the conversations quickly moved to Snapchat, where most of the correspondence during the relationship took place.   

When school returned six weeks later, it was mid-May. The physical relationship between the pair started in June and only ended when the boy’s aunt and cousin saw him get into Young’s car on July 7.

The victim’s cousin even filmed the moment he dragged the boy from the car and reported the pair to the school the next day.

But before they were caught, they had sex on multiple occasions between June 24 and July 6 2020, including at least twice on the school’s grounds and once in her car at a local park. 

The agreed facts also reveal the manipulative behaviour she used to encourage the boy to have sex with. 

On one occasion, she messaged him asking him to hug her at school the next day, and when he didn’t, she sent a follow up accusing him of ‘not having the balls’. 

The dare became a frequent tactic Young used to convince the boy to lure the boy into sexual liaisons.

On another occasion, she sent a message which read: ‘It’s dangerous if we get caught, but if you do it it’ll be worth it’. 

The duo exchanged messages about the sex acts they wanted to perform on each other, with Young initiated the ‘sexting’ on several occasions.

The most brazen of her offending occurred inside the school’s classrooms, once where she messaged her victim to meet him in an English room to perform a sex act on him, and a second time where she groped the boy at the back of the classroom while the rest of the year nine class watched Disney movie, WALL-E.     

During the movie, a friend of the boy even sat on the other side of him as the sex act took place.

The victim was also encouraged to lie about his whereabouts, telling his mother on one occasion he stayed back late at school to get help on an assignment, and even skipped afternoon classes to spend time with Young.

On the last day of school, the duo met on the staircase at 3.20pm to kiss goodbye, and Young performed oral sex on the 14-year-old. 

The sexting began on Instagram, but quickly moved to SnapChat (above)

The sexting began on Instagram, but quickly moved to SnapChat (above) 

She then returned to the staff room, the statement of facts read.  

The court heard that while they couldn’t find any comparable cases involving a young female teacher, a borderline personality disorder or post-traumatic stress (PTSD) often contributed to such offending.

The court on Thursday heard Young was sexually abused as a child by a student the same age as her victim. 

Her defence indicated there could be a subconscious link between her own trauma and the offending.

‘This is by means of explanation and certainly not an excuse… These are the most serious breaches of trust that a teacher could ever be involved in.’

Young moved in with her grandmother when she was granted bail, where she has no access to internet or a mobile phone

Pictured: Young on her way out of court on Thursday

Young was supported by her close relatives, who she say have stood by her even when she 'embarrassed and disappointed them'

Young expected to be sentenced on Thursday but the magistrate delayed proceedings to consider the outcome

On Thursday, she tearfully told the court she ‘regretted letting the relationship progress’ and begged his family for forgiveness. 

After Young’s emotional plea, Ms Cunneen asked the court to consider ‘how difficult it would be for a young lady of 23, in her first year of teaching, to maintain proper barriers, distance and authority over boys of this age… without being sexist at all’.

‘It cannot be forgotten that she was nine years older than the boy… It was an early time in this woman’s career, one gets a picture of a woman who could not cope with what she was given.’    

But prosecutor Alexander Terracini dismissed the defence, arguing that gender should not play any role in court proceedings.

He said that despite Young’s intentions in becoming a teacher, the ‘fact of the matter is that within months of accepting her first job she was abusing one of her students.

‘That simply cannot be ignored,’ he said.

Monica Elizabeth Young, 24, admitted to aggravated sexual intercourse with the boy in Homebush in June and July, 2020

Monica Elizabeth Young, 24, admitted to aggravated sexual intercourse with the boy in Homebush in June and July, 2020

Mr Terracini argued it shouldn’t make any difference if she were a male or a female, and that the only thing that should be considered in sentencing is that a 23-year-old adult abused a teenager.

‘Abuse is the key, not gender,’ he said. ‘It may be unusual… Perhaps I’m displaying more of a modern flavour but how on earth does gender play into it? How on earth is that relevant?

‘She chose to work at that school and she chose to abuse one of those students.’ 

The court heard Young started teaching at the all-boys school in southwest Sydney on March 20th, 2020, and was given 23 classes between year seven and 10.

She’d spent four-and-a-half years at university studying to teach PDHPE, and was ‘so proud’ of herself when she landed her first full-time role.

Of the 23 classes she was assigned, 12 were in geography – a subject which she had no formal training in and was always just ‘one page ahead’ of her students as she tried to teach herself the curriculum. 

By April, the Covid pandemic had forced the closure of schools and Young was required to teach her classes remotely via online learning channels. 

It was at this point that ‘the lines were criminally blurred’ as Young became ‘more accessible’ to her students, many of whom contacted her all hours of the night and day.

Of the 23 classes she was assigned, 12 were in geography - a subject which she had no formal training in and was always just 'one page ahead' of her students as she tried to teach herself the curriculum

Of the 23 classes she was assigned, 12 were in geography – a subject which she had no formal training in and was always just ‘one page ahead’ of her students as she tried to teach herself the curriculum

Young moved in with her grandmother when she was granted bail, where she has no access to internet or a mobile phone

Young moved in with her grandmother when she was granted bail, where she has no access to internet or a mobile phone

 On Thursday, Young took to the stand in front of the victim’s mother and cried as she apologised for ‘letting the relationship progress’ over the period of offending.

Young told the court that she was sexually abused when she was in Year 7 and could therefore understand the ‘trauma’ she had subjected the boy to.

‘I just never imagined I’d be one of those people… I’ve never been in trouble with the law. I hope he and his family can forgive me,’ she said through tears.

‘I was foolish.’

Young had been in a relationship for several years at the time of offending, but her defence counsel, former top prosecutor Margaret Cunneen SC, told the court it was ‘going very badly by this stage’.

Monica Elizabeth Young (pictured) originally pleaded not guilty but admitted to three counts of aggravated sexual intercourse with a minor. Pictured with her former fiance

Monica Elizabeth Young (pictured) originally pleaded not guilty but admitted to three counts of aggravated sexual intercourse with a minor. Pictured with her former fiance

‘There was a background of physical abuse, infidelity and drug taking… In addition she had an experience herself as a child.’

Ms Cunneen implored the Magistrate Kate Traill to consider ‘how often this terrible crime rears its’ head again in people who have been victims themselves’.

‘She can hardly believe that what happened, happened.’

There was confusion about Young’s relationship status in the courtroom, as Magistrate Traill asked whether she and her former fiance had ever officially tied the knot. 

‘She did not marry him according to the laws of Australia, but there was a particular religious ceremony,’ Ms Cunneen said. 

Young told the court in her tearful letter to the family that she regrets the relationship and understands that both her victim and his family will carry the trauma of the offence ‘for the rest of their lives’.

‘I knew it was wrong, I knew my actions were inappropriate but I couldn’t let myself believe it,’ she said. ‘He trusted me and I abused that trust.’   

Young had only just started her teaching career when the offences occurred between June 24 and July 6 last year

Young had only just started her teaching career when the offences occurred between June 24 and July 6 last year

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk