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NSW road toll: More speed cameras to curb rise

More speed cameras could soon be introduced in New South Wales as part of a raft of measures to curb the soaring death toll on the state’s roads.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian hopes to introduce a package after state cabinet was told last week there was a serious injury or fatality on NSW roads every 41 minutes. 

The measures – which are understood to include more point-to-point cameras – will be further discussed when parliament resumes next week.

There are calls to extend the average speed system – which in NSW only applies to heavy vehicles – to cover all speeding drivers.  

More speed cameras could soon be introduced in New South Wales to curb the soaring road toll. Above, the scene of the Boxing Day crash that killed actress Jessica Falkholt and her family

Premier Gladys Berejiklian hopes to introduce a package after state cabinet was told last week there was a serious injury or fatality on NSW roads every 41 minutes

Premier Gladys Berejiklian hopes to introduce a package after state cabinet was told last week there was a serious injury or fatality on NSW roads every 41 minutes

WHAT IS A POINT-TO-POINT SPEED CAMERA AND HOW DO THEY WORK? 

Point-to-point enforcement works by measuring the amount of time it takes a vehicle to drive between two points and then calculates the average speed.

If the vehicle’s average speed is higher than the speed limit for the length of road, the driver will receive a speeding infringement.

All Point-to-point enforcement lengths are certified by a registered land surveyor to ensure the accuracy of average speed calculations. 

The distance used when calculating a vehicle’s average speed across a Point-to-point enforcement length will be the shortest practicable distance which ensures that there is no possibility that a driver’s speed can be overestimated.

Point-to-point enforcement promotes area-wide suppression of speeding because speed enforcement is sustained over a length of road rather than just a single spot.

Source: http://www.rms.nsw.gov.au  

Peter Khoury from the NRMA said the government cannot rely on speed cameras – fixed or point-to-point – to reduce the road toll. 

‘Cameras have a role to play in terms of the safety they can deliver, but that role is limited.. we also want to see a high number of police, ‘ he told Daily Mail Australia.

‘We know clearly-marked visible police cars, a high number of them on the roads, really does change people’s behaviour permanently, not just at a location where there is a camera.’

Mr Khoury said he would like to see evidence average speed cameras were beneficial before more were introduced and cars are subjected to fines.   

‘Let’s see the evidence that suggests they’re going to make a difference on the road toll,’ he said.

‘If we’re going to became more reliant on cameras – especially point-to-point cameras – we’d like to see the evidence that it’s going to reduce the road toll.’

When asked if there was any data to suggest speed cameras save lives, he replied: ‘That’s the question that we keep asking.’ 

The push to introduce more cameras comes in the wake of the Boxing Day tragedy that killed actress Jessica Falkholt, 28, her sister Annabelle, 21, as well as her parents, Lars, 69, and Vivian, 60. 

The driver of the car that slammed into the family’s vehicle, Craig Whitall, was travelling home from a methadone clinic when he too was killed in the crash. 

The measures  will be further discussed when parliament resumes next week. This smash in Dubbo left a young couple dead earlier this month

The measures will be further discussed when parliament resumes next week. This smash in Dubbo left a young couple dead earlier this month

The measures are understood to include more point-to-point cameras. Pictured, the scene of the Falkholt tragedy 

The measures are understood to include more point-to-point cameras. Pictured, the scene of the Falkholt tragedy 

Ms Berejiklian earlier this month responded to the Falkholt tragedy by announcing measures to tackle drug drivers.

The plans include to double the number of roadside drug tests by 2020, while penalties for drug drivers would be brought into line with high-range drink driving.

Drug drivers could face two years in jail, $5,500 fine and/or licence disqualification for up to five years, under the proposal.

The measures will also look to reduce the risk posed by people taking prescription drugs and driving, while ­cocaine would be added to the drugs tested roadside. 

The package comes in the wake of the Boxing Day tragedy that killed actress Jessica Falkholt (right), 28, her sister Annabelle, 21, as well as her parents, Lars, 69, and Vivian, 60 

The package comes in the wake of the Boxing Day tragedy that killed actress Jessica Falkholt (right), 28, her sister Annabelle, 21, as well as her parents, Lars, 69, and Vivian, 60 

Craig Whitall (pictured), the driver of the car that slammed into the Falkholt's vehicle, was travelling home from a methadone clinic when he too was killed in the crash

Craig Whitall (pictured), the driver of the car that slammed into the Falkholt’s vehicle, was travelling home from a methadone clinic when he too was killed in the crash

‘This summer has been a tragic time for too many on our roads,’ Ms Berejiklian said at the time. 

‘Many families and friends have been left with the heartache of losing loved ones while thousands will now live with lifelong injuries from crashes.’

Last year saw 392 people die on NSW roads, with the toll increasing every year since hitting its lowest point in 2014. 

An additional 12 people died in 2017 compared to 2016. 

Speed accounted for nine more deaths in 2017 than 2016 while fatigue, alcohol and seatbelts were all linked to fewer deaths. 

Daily Mail Australia has contacted premier Berejiklian for comment.

JESSICA’S LAW: HOW DRIVERS WILL BE TESTED FOR DRUGS UNDER NEW REGULATIONS AS GOVERNMENT RESPONDS TO FALKHOLT FAMILY TRAGEDY

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian announced a raft of tough new measures in response to the Falkholt tragedy, which claimed the lives of the family-of-four.

The number of roadside drug tests will be doubled by 2020 and penalties for drug drivers will be increased and brought into line with high-range drink driving. 

Drug drivers could face two years in jail, $5500 fine and/or licence disqualification for up to five years.

The measures will also look to reduce the risk posed by people taking prescription drugs and driving.

The announcement came after the Falkholt family tragedy on Boxing Day.

Craig Whitall, the driver of the 4WD that slammed into the family’s car, was reportedly travelling home from methadone clinic when he too was killed in the crash.  

Jessica died at 10.20am on January 17 at St George Hospital after her life support was switched off six days earlier.

Her parents Lars, 69, and Vivian, 60, died at the scene and her sister Annabelle, 21, died from her injuries after a three-day fight for life.

There are calls to extend average speed cameras - which in NSW only applies to heavy vehicles - to cover all speeding drivers (stock image)

There are calls to extend average speed cameras – which in NSW only applies to heavy vehicles – to cover all speeding drivers (stock image)

Home and Away actress Jessica Falkholt was killed along with her family in the Boxing Day tragedy 

Home and Away actress Jessica Falkholt was killed along with her family in the Boxing Day tragedy 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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