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Nurse warns pregnant women not to shave pubic hair before birth – can lead to SERIOUS INFECTION

A nurse has warned pregnant women not to shave their pubic hair before giving birth, claiming it can lead to serious infection after labor.

Angela Grant Buechne, who is a doula, registered nurse, and lactation consultant from Toronto, Canada, recently went viral on TikTok after she told expecting mothers not to shave their private parts.  

Angela, who has been working with new families and babies for over 20 years, explained that using a razor to get rid of your pubic hair before giving birth can lead to infection due to the small cuts that the razor makes on your skin, and she claimed it just isn’t worth the risk.

  

A nurse has warned pregnant women not to shave their pubic hair before giving birth, and claimed it can lead to serious infection after labor

Angela Grant Buechne, who is a doula, registered nurse, and lactation consultant from Toronto, Canada, went viral on TikTok after she told expecting mothers not to shave

Angela Grant Buechne, who is a doula, registered nurse, and lactation consultant from Toronto, Canada, went viral on TikTok after she told expecting mothers not to shave

Angela explained that using a razor to get rid of your pubic hair before giving birth can actually lead to infection, due to the small cuts that it makes on your skin

Angela explained that using a razor to get rid of your pubic hair before giving birth can actually lead to infection, due to the small cuts that it makes on your skin

‘Pregnant? Don’t shave the bush! Did you know that it’s actually not recommended to shave pubic hair after 36 weeks of pregnancy?’ she wrote in the clip, which has now been viewed more than three million times.

‘Shaving pubic hair can increase risk of infection at the same time of birth, even with cesarean birth.

‘Waxing isn’t necessary either and is more painful during pregnancy. Doctors don’t care. Leave the bush alone!’  

During an interview with Buzzfeed, Angela explained that her goal in posting the video was to educate women and share ‘unbiased, non-judgmental information.’

‘My whole mission on TikTok is to share unbiased, non-judgmental information so people can learn something new,’ she explained.

‘I shared the TikTok because I know that in some places (especially the US), it may still be common for women/birthers to be shaved or told to remove their pubic hair before birth, even though current research shows that it’s not necessary and even increases the risk of infection.

Many people took to the comment section to share their own experiences, and one viewer said a nurse shaved them when they went into labor - without asking

Many people took to the comment section to share their own experiences, and one viewer said a nurse shaved them when they went into labor – without asking

'Just because it's done, doesn't mean it's actually the best practice,' Angela said

She added: 'There is actually no surgery where shaving with a razor is recommended anymore'

‘Just because it’s done, doesn’t mean it’s actually the best practice,’ Angela said. ‘There is actually no surgery where shaving with a razor is recommended anymore’

‘I’m in Canada, where it hasn’t been standard practice for many years.’

Many people took to the comment section of Angela’s video to share their own experiences, and some said their doctors told them that they had to shave their privates before giving birth. Another said a nurse did it for them when they went into labor – without even asking.

Angela added: ‘Unfortunately, just because something is still standard practice in healthcare, it doesn’t mean that it’s best practice.

‘There is actually no surgery where shaving with a razor is recommended anymore, as it increases the risk of infection due to microabrasions.

‘If anything, clipping and trimming are OK if people really feel the need to groom before labor or birth.

‘Waxing or shaving more than a few days ahead of birth is best so you have a chance to heal, but since you can’t predict when you’ll go into labor, after 36 weeks can be a gamble.’ 

Another doctor from Boston, Massachusetts, named Kate White, echoed Angela’s suggestions. 

‘Research and medical studies have shown that there is no benefit to shaving – only clear risks,’ she told Today Show. 

‘It’s true that for decades, women were shaved in the hospital before delivery – but they were also given enemas, twilight sleep and sometimes strapped to the bed. Thankfully, science has progressed and we know a lot more now.’

The nurse said, 'Shaving a few days ahead of birth is best so you have a chance to heal, but since you can't predict when you'll go into labor, after 36 weeks can be a gamble'

The nurse said, ‘Shaving a few days ahead of birth is best so you have a chance to heal, but since you can’t predict when you’ll go into labor, after 36 weeks can be a gamble’

Angela, who has been working with new families and babies for over 20 years, said her goal in posting the video was to educate women and share 'unbiased, non-judgmental information'

Angela, who has been working with new families and babies for over 20 years, said her goal in posting the video was to educate women and share ‘unbiased, non-judgmental information’

She explained that a razor makes small cuts on your skin, and those can easily become infected. It can also cause folliculitis (small red bumps on your skin), ingrown hairs, or cellulitis (a bacterial skin infection).

And according to the doctor, even people who get a C-section are at risk.

‘With Cesarean section – about a third of women will end up having one – shaving has been shown to increase the risk of infection,’ she added.

‘Recovery from C-section is hard enough. You don’t need to add an infection on top of it.

‘I can promise you that your provider is not looking at anything related to your hair because they are totally focused on your cervix and the baby coming down on your vagina.’

An OBGYN, named Dr. Erica Montes, also pointed out to Buzzfeed that pubic hair serves a purpose.

She said: ‘It provides protection against friction that can cause skin irritation, it helps reduce the amount of sweat produced in the vulvar region, it helps regulate body temperature, and it also serves a similar function to eyelashes or nose hair.

‘In addition, it can trap dirt, debris, and organisms. Therefore, it may protect against common vaginal infections, STIs, and UTIs.’

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk