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Octopus Disappears Down Tiny Hole in Ambon in Indonesia and is filmed by a diver

  • Eight-tentacled creature shuffles along ocean floor before fiiting through gap
  • Diver caught the fascinating footage in Ambon, Indonesia, late in the evening
  • Octopus have no bones meaning they’re incredibly flexible to escape predators 

This is the extraordinary moment an octopus disappears after squeezing itself down a tiny hole.

A diver caught the improbable footage in Ambon, Indonesia, while taking a late-night dip.

The eight-tentacled animal can be seen shuffling along the ocean floor as the diver follows him with his camera. 

The octopus scurries along, feeling out the surface below it with the suction cups on its arms, until reaches a spot with lots of dents and grooves.

It hovers over a tiny hole and begins putting its tentacles down before squeezing its head and entire body down too. 

Because octopus’ don’t have any bones, they’re extremely flexible and can manipulate their bodies in unusual ways.

It stuffed its body down this tiny gap

The octopus squeezed down a tiny hole in Ambon, Indonesia, as a diver followed him with a camera

One by one it stuffs its legs through the gap before forcing its head through 

One by one it stuffs its legs through the gap before forcing its head through 

Because of this octopuses are able to fit into small spaces, squeeze through tiny openings and cracks

They can hide in areas that would be inaccessible to most predators and vertebrae animals

Because of this octopuses are able to fit into small spaces, squeeze through tiny openings and cracks and hide in areas that would be inaccessible to most predators and vertebrae animals

Because of this octopuses are able to fit into small spaces, squeeze through tiny openings and cracks and hide in areas that would be inaccessible to most predators and vertebrae animals.

And because they don’t have any air bladders or gas pockets, the creatures can go down holes that are extremely deep. 

It uses these tricks to its advantage to escape predators.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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