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Officer shot in ambush sues social media giants ‘for radicalizing gunman Micah Xavier Johnson’

Police officer shot in ambush at Dallas Black Lives Matter protest in 2016 sues Facebook, Twitter and Google ‘for radicalizing gunman’

  • Jesus Retana, 34, was injured when the army reservist opened fire in July 2016
  • He has filed a lawsuit claiming Hamas was able to use Facebook, Twitter and Google ‘as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda’ which reached Johnson 
  • Johnson had no confirmed links to Hamas but identified as a black nationalist
  • A similar lawsuit filed by Altman in 2017 for another officer was dismissed
  • He has also represented clients against social networks over the 2015 Paris attack, the Pulse nightclub shooting and the Bastille Day attack in France
  • Dallas police officers Patrick Zamarripa, Michael Krol, Lorne Ahrens and Michael J. Smith, as well as DART Officer Brent Thompson were all killed in the massacre

A police officer shot in an ambush at a Dallas Black Lives Matter protest is suing social media giants including Facebook, Twitter and Google for radicalizing shooter Micah Xavier Johnson.

Jesus Retana, 34, was one of nine cops injured when the 25-year-old Army reservist opened fire in July 2016. Five others were killed in the deadliest attack on U.S. law enforcement since September 11, 2001.

Now Retana, who was shot in the arm, has filed a lawsuit, along with his husband Andrew Moss claiming Hamas was able to use the sites ‘as a tool for spreading extremist propaganda’ which reached Johnson.

Johnson had no confirmed links to Hamas but Retana’s attorney Keith Altman told CBS: ‘Hamas’ ability to reach into the United States has been greatly enhanced, it’s been greatly enhanced by using social media.’

Retana was injured when army reservist Johnson, pictured, opened fire in July 2016

Jesus Retana, left, was injured when army reservist Johnson, right, opened fire in July 2016. He claims Hamas used Facebook, Twitter and Google ‘as a tool for spreading propaganda’

Johnson's activity online suggests he became interested with black militant groups. On Facebook, he identified himself as a black nationalist, and his profile picture showed him wearing a dashiki and holding a clenched first in the air like a Black Panther

Johnson’s activity online suggests he became interested with black militant groups. On Facebook, he identified himself as a black nationalist, and his profile picture showed him wearing a dashiki and holding a clenched first in the air like a Black Panther

Altman added: ‘Right now, they are basically doing nothing. They absolutely know that the terrorists are using their sites. This is not the dark web.

‘Mentally, he’s just not the same person. He has nightmares, sweats. It has a tremendous impact on his life and his husband’s. They suffer every single day from what happened.

‘If you ask my clients, their goal is no more funerals. No one should lose a loved one or friend to a terrorist attack. And no company should help fund terrorist attacks.’

A similar lawsuit filed by Altman in 2017 for another officer Sgt. Demetrick Pennie was dismissed by a judge.

The judge said the plaintiffs did not ‘plausibly allege a connection between Hamas and the Dallas shooting.’

The Star Telegram reports Altman has also represented clients against social networks over the 2015 Paris attack, the Pulse nightclub shooting and the Bastille Day attack in France.

Dallas police officers Patrick Zamarripa, Michael Krol, Lorne Ahrens and Michael J. Smith, as well as DART Officer Brent Thompson were all killed in the massacre.

Officers, from left, Michael Krol, Brent Thompson, Lorne Ahrens, Michael Smith and Patrick Zamarripa, were killed in the ambush at a Dallas Black Lives Matter protest

Officers, from left, Michael Krol, Brent Thompson, Lorne Ahrens, Michael Smith and Patrick Zamarripa, were killed in the ambush at a Dallas Black Lives Matter protest

Dallas Police Chief David Brown prays during a a vigil at Thanks-Giving square in Dallas in 2016

Dallas Police Chief David Brown prays during a a vigil at Thanks-Giving square in Dallas in 2016

Johnson’s activity online suggest he became interested with black militant groups. On Facebook, he identified himself as a black nationalist, and his profile picture shows him wearing a dashiki and holding a clenched first in the air like a Black Panther.

Johnson ‘liked’ pages related to the Nation of Islam, the Black Riders Liberation Party, the New Black Panther Party and the African American Defense League.

Facebook and Google did not responded to requests for comment, CBS Dallas reports. Twitter told the network it isn’t commenting.

DailyMail.com has contacted Facebook, Twitter and Google for comment.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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