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One in four parents aware of controversial curriculum for under-11s emphasising transgender rights

Just one in four parents are aware of controversial new curriculum for under-11s that emphasises transgender rights, survey finds

  • LGB Alliance found that just one in four parents are aware of the new curriculum
  • The survey also found 69% of parents back JK Rowling’s essay posted this month
  • Pressure group Stonewall produced the ‘LGBT-inclusive primary curriculum’

Only one in four parents are aware of a controversial new curriculum for primary schools which emphasises transgender rights, a poll has found.

Ministers are being urged to delay the introduction of the programme in September to allow more time for the details to be studied.

The survey, commissioned by newly-formed gay rights campaign the LGB Alliance, found only a quarter of parents of children aged five to 16 were quite or very aware of the new curriculum, which recommends books for pupils including one titled: ‘Are you a Boy or a Girl?’

A survey conducted by LGB Alliance found that only one in four parents are aware of a new curriculum for primary schools. The Populus poll of 3.856 people showed 69% of parents back JK Rowling after she expressed concern about ‘transgender activism’ in an essay

The Populus poll of 3.856 people also showed 69 per cent of parents back JK Rowling after she expressed deep concern about ‘transgender activism’ in an essay this month.

The Harry Potter author faced strong criticism online for defending a researcher who said that men cannot change into women.

Pressure group Stonewall has produced a ‘LGBT-inclusive primary curriculum’ guide, supported by the taxpayer-funded Government Equalities Office, for primary teachers that stresses trans rights.

It issued the guidance to coincide with new relationships and sex education lessons in September. Parents can remove their children from sex lessons but ones covering relationships are compulsory.

The document says: ‘Remember to teach children that ‘they’, ‘them’ and ‘their’ can be singular as well as plural. You could use it as an opportunity to learn that a lot of non-binary people prefer not to be referred to as he or she.’ 

The guide says: ‘Everyone has a gender identity. This is the gender that someone feels they are. This might be the same as they were given as a baby, but it might not. They might feel like they are a different gender, or they might not feel like they are a boy or a girl.’

Stonewall, a registered charity, has been accused of adopting a militant trans agenda by some leading members, who quit in protest. They include broadcaster Simon Fanshawe and Maureen Chadwick, the creator of hit TV series Footballers Wives, and Waterloo Road. 

Mo Wiltshire, Stonewall's director of education and youth, (pictured) said teachers did not have to use Stonewall's 'LGBT-inclusive primary curriculum' guide, then adding there is 'nothing wrong' with showing children that 'trans people exist'

Mo Wiltshire, Stonewall’s director of education and youth, (pictured) said teachers did not have to use Stonewall’s ‘LGBT-inclusive primary curriculum’ guide, then adding there is ‘nothing wrong’ with showing children that ‘trans people exist’

Stonewall criticised broadcaster Dame Jenni Murray in 2017 for questioning the right of those who had transitioned from male to female to be called ‘real women’. In its last published accounts Stonewall declared £610,000 in taxpayers’ money, including £234,000 from the Department for Education.

The LGB Alliance, set up last year by disillusioned former members of Stonewall, is lobbying MPs to think again about the curriculum.

A spokesman for the group said: ‘Any curriculum that tells primary school children from age five upwards that they ‘may be born in the wrong body’ is a bad idea. Young children are easily influenced and confused.’

Liz Truss, the equalities minister, said: ‘This document was not approved by Government. The Government Equalities Office logo should not be on it and I have asked for it to be removed.’

Mo Wiltshire, Stonewall’s director of education and youth, said teachers did not have to use the curriculum guide.

She said: ‘There’s nothing wrong with showing kids that some families have two mums or two dads, or that trans people exist.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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