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Parents of drowned toddler Braxton Slager break down

The biological parents of a toddler who drowned in a backyard swimming pool just three weeks after being placed into temporary care broke down outside court.

Braxton Slager was only 22-months old when he died in an unsafe pool at his foster home in Stanhope Gardens in Sydney’s northwest in September 2014.

Johnny Slager and Vanessa Naumovska were devastated by their son’s death, and were inconsolable while speaking to reporters on Monday.

 

The biological parents of a toddler (pictured) who drowned in a backyard swimming pool just three weeks after being placed into temporary care broke down outside court

Johnny Slager (pictured, right) and Vanessa Naumovska (pictured, left) were devastated by their son's death, and were inconsolable while speaking to reporters on Monday

Johnny Slager (pictured, right) and Vanessa Naumovska (pictured, left) were devastated by their son’s death, and were inconsolable while speaking to reporters on Monday

Braxton Slager (pictured with father Johnny Slager) was only 22-months old when he died in an unsafe pool at his foster home in Stanhope Gardens in Sydney's northwest in September 2014

Braxton Slager (pictured with father Johnny Slager) was only 22-months old when he died in an unsafe pool at his foster home in Stanhope Gardens in Sydney’s northwest in September 2014

A coronial inquest has been underway to determine whether systemic failures contributed to boy’s death, Nine News reported. 

‘He was a beautiful little boy, he loved to go outside playing. He liked riding his bike and running around playing with his ball,’ said Mr Slager.

‘He was just your average high-spirited little kid.’ 

‘We just want justice for our little boy. He didn’t deserve to die especially when he was in a home that was supposed to be safe for him,’ said Ms Naumovska.

'He was a beautiful little boy, he loved to go outside playing. He liked riding his bike and running around playing with his ball,' said Mr Slager (pictured is Braxton Slager)

‘He was a beautiful little boy, he loved to go outside playing. He liked riding his bike and running around playing with his ball,’ said Mr Slager (pictured is Braxton Slager)

The pool (pictured) had a broken gate, was unregistered and did not meet safety standards, and the home and yard was littered with tools, beer cans and dangerous objects

The pool (pictured) had a broken gate, was unregistered and did not meet safety standards, and the home and yard was littered with tools, beer cans and dangerous objects

Braxton was placed into foster care after his father reached out to the Department of Family and Community Services for help while he withdrew from methadone.

His mother was allegedly not eligible for custody due to drug problems of her own.

Life Without Barriers was contracted by the department to conduct safety checks on Braxton’s new home.

Despite photos from the home showing it in a squalid state, Life Without Barriers had approved it a year earlier. 

Despite photos from the home (pictured) showing it in a squalid state, Life Without Barriers had approved it a year earlier

Despite photos from the home (pictured) showing it in a squalid state, Life Without Barriers had approved it a year earlier

The pool had a broken gate, was unregistered and did not meet safety standards, and the home and yard was littered with tools, beer cans and dangerous objects.

Life Without Barriers staff only did full-home inspections once every three years, and during their monthly checks never went beyond a front room.

Braxton’s carer reported being on Facebook when she noticed the sliding door was open.

She then found the little boy outside, face down and blue in the pool.

Although a Careflight helicopter was called to the home, Braxton could not be resuscitated.     

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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