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Parents slam Abor Grove Primary School in Perth after banning cupcakes on students’ birthdays

‘What a pathetic joke… absolutely disgusting’: Parents’ fury as a Perth school bans CUPCAKES at birthday celebrations for ‘cultural reasons’

  • Arbor Grove Primary School has banned students bringing in lollies and cakes
  • Principal Glen Purdy said the ban was to do with allergies and cultural diversity  
  • Parents have lashed out saying the ban is ‘disgusting’ and against tradition

Parents have lashed out at a primary school after its principal said students weren’t able to bring cupcakes and lolly bags to class to celebrate their birthday.  

Arbor Grove Primary School in Ellenbrook, Perth issued a letter to parents saying the food would no longer be allowed due to health and cultural reasons.

Principal Glen Purdy said students who brought in unhealthy food items would have their stash confiscated by their teacher and returned at the end of the day. 

Arbor Grove Primary School (pictured) in Ellenbrook, Perth issued a letter to parents saying lolly bags and cupcakes would no longer be allowed due to health and cultural reasons.

In the lengthy letter warning parents of the new rule, Mr Purdy said the ban was due to an increasing amount of students with allergies as well as the ‘cultural diversity’ of its students.

‘Whilst teachers at Arbor Grove are happy to celebrate the birthdays of students in the classroom, we must do so in the most inclusive, practical and appropriate way,’ he said. 

‘During our deliberations we have been mindful of the increasing number of students with food allergies and intolerances, the cultural diversity of the school and the beliefs and traditions of these cultures.

‘As of Monday 17 February we would ask that parents no longer send students with cupcakes, lolly bags or other unhealthy options for students to share with their classmates for their birthdays.’ 

The school's principal Glen Purdy said he recognised the ban wouldn't be popular but would be put in place from Monday

The school’s principal Glen Purdy said he recognised the ban wouldn’t be popular but would be put in place from Monday

The principal said that while it wasn’t a ‘universally popular decision’ it would help avoid the risk of a child suffering a ‘life threatening health issue’ if they had any allergies.

Mr Purdy also said the rules were ‘respectful to the cultural diversity within the school’, which has students from 14 different nationalities. 

The letter was flooded with criticism from parents, with some saying they should have been able to vote before the ban was put in place.

‘Why didn’t they ask the parents to vote? Out of a school over 500 students, let’s say 125 are of cultural difference. What ever happened to majority rules. Man I’m p****d,’ one mother said in a parents Facebook page for the school. 

‘Absolutely disgusting. There are a lot more important issues this school should be concerned about & trying to fix NOT STOPPING OUR KIDS FROM BEING KIDS,’ another parent wrote.

‘What a pathetic joke of a school. Bowing to the minorities once again!!! This school should be ashamed of itself!’ someone commented.

Students who do bring cupcakes or lolly bags to celebrate their birthday will not be able to share and will have them returned to them at the end of the day (file image)

Students who do bring cupcakes or lolly bags to celebrate their birthday will not be able to share and will have them returned to them at the end of the day (file image)

Many were outraged that they had to change Australian traditions to meet those of other cultures.

‘So we can send the kids to school with healthy/toy loot bags and that would still be deemed as breaching cultural diversities? I’m calling racism and unfairness on our Aussie traditions here and I am extremely offended by this action,’ a father said.

‘I don’t put my children through our Australian school to be told that we have to abide by other beliefs, traditions and cultures against and over our very own. It is bloody Australia and we have traditions of our own.’

‘Don’t even get me started… so it’s okay to sell soft drinks at a school disco for fundraising but not ok to bring a cupcake to school for a birthday,’ a mother wrote. 

One parent suggested children be allowed to bring in non-food items like balls or coloured pencils.  

‘It would be a very sad day when a child is not allowed to celebrate their birthday at school,’ they said. 

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the school for comment. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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