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Paris riot police blast water cannon at demonstrators protesting Macron’s fuel tax rise 

A water cannon and rounds of teargas were used by riot police against thousands of French ‘Yellow Vest’ fuel protestors in Paris today as the Champs Elysee was reduced to a battlefield.

The worst violence took place on the most famous avenue in the city where a huge crowd called for President Emmanuel Macron to resign.

‘They included hooded demonstrators who were determined to cause trouble,’ said a police officer at the scene.

‘We’ve been forced to deploy a water cannon and used tear gas to stop them getting to a secure zone.

‘They’re breaking up traffic obstacles to create missiles to throw at us. It’s getting very violent.’

Protestors and police are seen clashing on the Champs Elysee as part of a nationwide protest in Paris against higher fuel prices. The Yellow Vests – gilets jaunes in French – are named after the high visibility jackets that they wear, and are conducting a grassroots campaign against escalating petrol and diesel prices

Some 3000 police were on the streets of central Paris today, where the protestors pledged to bring the city to a standstill. Two road deaths have been linked with the protests so far – both at illegal road blocks set up by the Yellow Vests

Some 3000 police were on the streets of central Paris today, where the protestors pledged to bring the city to a standstill. Two road deaths have been linked with the protests so far – both at illegal road blocks set up by the Yellow Vests

The Yellow Vests – gilets jaunes in French – are named after the high visibility jackets that they wear, and are conducting a grassroots campaign against escalating petrol and diesel prices

The Yellow Vests – gilets jaunes in French – are named after the high visibility jackets that they wear, and are conducting a grassroots campaign against escalating petrol and diesel prices

Some 3000 police were on the streets of central Paris today, where the protestors pledged to bring the city to a standstill

Some 3000 police were on the streets of central Paris today, where the protestors pledged to bring the city to a standstill

The zone included the Elysee Palace – Mr Macron’s official home – and the Place de la Concorde, opposite the National Assembly, France’s parliament.

The Yellow Vests – gilets jaunes in French – are named after the high visibility jackets that they wear, and are conducting a grassroots campaign against escalating petrol and diesel prices.

Senior French ministers have slammed the ‘radicalisation’ and ‘anarchy’ involved, claiming far-Right and hard-Left elements have hijacked the protests.

Two road deaths have been linked with them so far – both at illegal road blocks set up by the Yellow Vests.

There have also been 553 woundings, 17 of them serious. More than 95 police have been hurt in a variety of disturbances, including an attempt to storm the Elysee Palace last weekend.

Some 3000 police were on the streets of central Paris today, where the protestors pledged to bring the city to a standstill.

By 11am, clouds of tea gas covered the Champs Elysee, and especially the area close to the place de la Concorde.

There have also been 553 woundings, 17 of them serious. More than 95 police have been hurt in a variety of disturbances, including an attempt to storm the Elysee Palace last weekend. Despite this, protestors continued to gather in the city today (pictured)

There have also been 553 woundings, 17 of them serious. More than 95 police have been hurt in a variety of disturbances, including an attempt to storm the Elysee Palace last weekend. Despite this, protestors continued to gather in the city today (pictured)

The Champ de Mars - the field next to the Eiffel Tower – had been set aside by the Paris authorities for the demonstration, but it was ignored by the protestors

The Champ de Mars – the field next to the Eiffel Tower – had been set aside by the Paris authorities for the demonstration, but it was ignored by the protestors

Mr Macron has insisted that fuel prices have to rise in line with green initiatives made necessary by the Paris Climate Change agreement. But protestors continue to campaign against the price hikes  

Mr Macron has insisted that fuel prices have to rise in line with green initiatives made necessary by the Paris Climate Change agreement. But protestors continue to campaign against the price hikes  

Senior French ministers have slammed the ‘radicalisation’ and ‘anarchy’ involved, claiming far-Right and hard-Left elements have hijacked the protests

Senior French ministers have slammed the ‘radicalisation’ and ‘anarchy’ involved, claiming far-Right and hard-Left elements have hijacked the protests

A water cannon and rounds of teargas were used by riot police against the thousands of French ‘Yellow Vest’ fuel protestors in Paris today

A water cannon and rounds of teargas were used by riot police against the thousands of French ‘Yellow Vest’ fuel protestors in Paris today

Last week a woman died and more than 400 people were hurt in a day and night of 'yellow vest' protests over rising fuel price hikes across France

Last week a woman died and more than 400 people were hurt in a day and night of ‘yellow vest’ protests over rising fuel price hikes across France

Running battles were taking place between mobile squads of CRS police, and the demonstrators, as objects were thrown between the two.

The Champ de Mars – the field next to the Eiffel Tower – had been set aside by the Paris authorities for the demonstration, but it was ignored by the protestors.

‘We’re not here to do what officials tell us,’ said Max Lefevre, a 22-year-old student taking part in the demonstrations.

‘We’re here to oppose a government that is completely out of touch with the lives of ordinary people. This is a people’s revolt.’

Mr Macron has insisted that fuel prices have to rise in line with green initiatives made necessary by the Paris Climate Change agreement.

He said there would be ‘no possiblity’ of his government backing down in the face of disturbances.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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