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Pete Evans shares the VERY decadent breakfast he recommends for children

Would your kids eat this? Chef Pete Evans shares the ridiculous breakfast he makes for his young daughters – including a ‘wagyu hot dog’, $47 caviar and sauerkraut

  • Celebrity chef Pete Evans revealed the breakfast he makes his two daughters
  • It involves boiled organic eggs topped with caviar, sauerkraut and a hot dog
  • If they’re still hungry Pete will make some coconut yoghurt and chicken broth
  • The young kids don’t eat gluten, dairy, sugar or any processed foods

Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans has revealed the gourmet breakfast he feeds his teenage daughters, which includes organic eggs, sauerkraut and a wagyu hot dog.

The 46-year-old My Kitchen Rules host prepares the Paleo-approved dish some mornings for his daughters Chilli, 14, and Indii, 12, before they head off to school.

‘Surf and turf breakfast for the girls,’ Pete, who lives on a farm in the Northern Rivers of New South Wales, wrote on Facebook.

‘Boiled organic eggs topped with Yarra Valley caviar, kraut and the new Cleavers Organic grass fed wagyu hot dog with chilli sauce.’

Boiled organic eggs topped with Yarra Valley caviar, kraut and the new Cleavers Organic grass fed wagyu hot dog with chilli sauce are on the menu

Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans (pictured) has revealed the gourmet breakfast he feeds his two teenage daughters

Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans (pictured) has revealed the gourmet breakfast he feeds his two teenage daughters

He went on to say that the girls get a small portion of fruit, coconut yoghurt and chicken broth with ‘greens from the garden’ for breakfast on less extravagant cooking days.  

‘Always some form of animal fat and protein in the form of land or water-based animals including eggs,’ he said. 

Other variants for brunch can be an omelette, cucumber, some leafy greens, sauerkraut, fish eggs and a few rashers of bacon.

The doting dad went on to say that the girls get a small portion of fruit, coconut yoghurt and chicken broth with 'greens from the garden' for breakfast on less extravagant cooking days

The doting dad went on to say that the girls get a small portion of fruit, coconut yoghurt and chicken broth with ‘greens from the garden’ for breakfast on less extravagant cooking days

Other variants for brunch can be an omelette, cucumber, some leafy greens, sauerkraut, fish eggs and a few rashers of bacon

Pete Evans prepares a chicken broth

‘The girls favourite food is fish eggs so we get a jar every week as a treat,’ he wrote in a post on Instagram

Fish eggs feature so prominently because, according to Pete, his daughters are a huge fan.

‘The girls favourite food is fish eggs so we get a jar every week as a treat,’ he wrote in a post on Instagram, to which he added the hashtags: #guthealth, #foodismedicine and #paleo.

Pete and his family do not eat gluten, dairy, processed foods and sugar as part of their following of the Paleo lifestyle.

What is the Paleo diet?

A Paleo diet is a dietary plan based on foods similar to what might have been eaten during the Paleolithic era, which dates from approximately 2.5 million to 10,000 years ago. 

It typically includes lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds – foods that in the past could be obtained by hunting and gathering. 

A Paleo diet limits foods that became common when farming emerged about 10,000 years ago. These foods include dairy products, legumes and grains.

Source: Mayo Clinic

Pete and his family do not eat gluten, dairy, processed foods and sugar as part of their following of the Paleo lifestyle (his daughters pictured)

Pete and his family do not eat gluten, dairy, processed foods and sugar as part of their following of the Paleo lifestyle (his daughters pictured)

Pete enjoys lean meats, fish (pictured), fruits, vegetables and nuts

Pete enjoys lean meats, fish (pictured), fruits, vegetables and nuts

Instead they mainly eat lean meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

He has previously spoken about persuading his girls not to eat lolly bags when they come home from a children’s party.

‘What if the bunnies wanted to eat lollies because the other bunnies in the street were and there was a chance that maybe their bunnies would get sick or not live as long or be in pain, would they ever feed the bunnies the lollies?’ he told News Corp.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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