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Photographer Hulia Boz reveals unseen Australia in aerial postcards photos at exhibition in New York

The unseen side of Australia’s raw beauty will be taken to New York to showcase the country to America.

Hulia Boz, an aerial landscape photographer from Sydney, is taking a collection of 32 pictures to the heart of the Big Apple in a bid to show the US there’s more to Australia than Bondi Beach and Uluru.

The 37-year-old who gave up her job as paparazzi and celebrity photographer now spends her time capturing a bird’s eye view of the country.

Hulia Boz, a photographer from Sydney, is showing off Australia’s unseen beauty at an exhibition in New York (pictured is her work titled Yawuru Country near Broome in Western Australia)

The unseen side of Australia's raw beauty is the subject of the exhibition at the Australian Consulate-General on 42nd Street from June 6 (pictured is the photograph called 'Above and Beyond')

The unseen side of Australia’s raw beauty is the subject of the exhibition at the Australian Consulate-General on 42nd Street from June 6 (pictured is the photograph called ‘Above and Beyond’)

Boz, an aerial landscape photographer from Sydney, is taking a collection of 32 pictures to the heart of the Big Apple (this work is called 'Melodrama')

Boz, an aerial landscape photographer from Sydney, is taking a collection of 32 pictures to the heart of the Big Apple (this work is called ‘Melodrama’)

The 37-year-old who gave up her job as paparazzi and celebrity photographer and now focuses her time on going into the skies (pictured is 'Pink Lagoon' at Port Gregory in Western Australia)

The 37-year-old who gave up her job as paparazzi and celebrity photographer and now focuses her time on going into the skies (pictured is ‘Pink Lagoon’ at Port Gregory in Western Australia)

She was invited to display the work in the Australian Consulate-General building on the illustrious 42nd Street by Australia’s Consulate General to New York, Alastair Walton.

Works from the exhibition, called ‘Postcards From Australia’, are not the standard snapshots of Bondi Beach, Sydney Harbour or the Great Barrier Reef.

‘I’ve been waiting a long time for this and it’s always been a dream,’ Boz said speaking to Daily Mail Australia.

‘New York to me is the Mecca of the creative world and I feel I’m about to make an artist’s pilgrimage. 

Boz (pictured above) is using the Australian landscape as her canvas and spoke of her excitement at taking the exhibition to New York

Boz (pictured above) is using the Australian landscape as her canvas and spoke of her excitement at taking the exhibition to New York

She was invited to display the work in the Australian Consulate-General building in the illustrious 42nd Street Gallery by Australia's Consulate General to New York, Alastair Walton (pictured is 'Our Home Town')

She was invited to display the work in the Australian Consulate-General building in the illustrious 42nd Street Gallery by Australia’s Consulate General to New York, Alastair Walton (pictured is ‘Our Home Town’)

‘I feel excited and fearful at the same time – kind of like when you’d perform on stage as a child in front of the school.

‘I am so honoured and hope to make Australia proud and I’ve got beautiful shots and to represent our backyard in the creative hub of the world is incredible.’

She has taken inspiration from Australian artist John Olson who Boz says has been her key influence since she was at high school in Strathfield in western Sydney.

Boz said: ‘I wanted to capture raw. I wanted to work without filters or editing.

‘Using Google, I found some amazing colours in Australia to find the perfect combination of colour and light.’

You won't see any standard snapshots of  Bondi Beach, Sydney Harbour or the Great Barrier Reef in Hoz' 'Postcards From Australia' exhibition (pictured is 'Lil Ripper')

You won’t see any standard snapshots of Bondi Beach, Sydney Harbour or the Great Barrier Reef in Hoz’ ‘Postcards From Australia’ exhibition (pictured is ‘Lil Ripper’)

'I've been waiting a long time for this and it's always been a dream,' Boz said speaking to Daily Mail Australia about taking her work to New York (pictured is the work 'Sandy Tracks')

‘I’ve been waiting a long time for this and it’s always been a dream,’ Boz said speaking to Daily Mail Australia about taking her work to New York (pictured is the work ‘Sandy Tracks’)

She picked out one photograph called Poetry To The Eye (pictured) which she explained came about after a blind man asked her to describe the ocean

She picked out one photograph called Poetry To The Eye (pictured) which she explained came about after a blind man asked her to describe the ocean

She has taken inspiration from Australian artist John Olson who Boz says has been an inspiration since she was at high school in Strathfield in western Sydney (pictured is 'Where The Branches Break the Sun')

She has taken inspiration from Australian artist John Olson who Boz says has been an inspiration since she was at high school in Strathfield in western Sydney (pictured is ‘Where The Branches Break the Sun’)

'To get an aerial view of Australia when I was up there, it was like looking down on my magical carpet, to see those colours,' Boz said

‘To get an aerial view of Australia when I was up there, it was like looking down on my magical carpet, to see those colours,’ Boz said

Boz now travels across Australia and goes up around twice a month to capture new and stunning images from the air

Boz now travels across Australia and goes up around twice a month to capture new and stunning images from the air

She travels across Australia and goes up around twice a month to capture new and stunning images from the air.

Not all of the pictures in the exhibition reveal their location with Boz giving names to her works. 

‘To get an aerial view of Australia when I was up there, it was like looking down on my magical carpet, to see those colours.

‘You never really have full control up in the air, it’s always new. 

‘The canvas is below your feet and the wind blowing in your hair. You can never really plan for that and that’s the beauty.

'The canvas is below your feet and the wind blowing in your hair. You can never really plan for that and that's the beauty'

‘The canvas is below your feet and the wind blowing in your hair. You can never really plan for that and that’s the beauty’

Boz says she hopes the work showcases the lesser known areas of Australia such as Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania

Boz says she hopes the work showcases the lesser known areas of Australia such as Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania

She explained she wanted the work to be raw, unedited and without any filters which she hopes will show off another side of Australia than Bondi Beach

She explained she wanted the work to be raw, unedited and without any filters which she hopes will show off another side of Australia than Bondi Beach

‘I think Australia is known very well for its beautiful beaches.

‘But an aerial shot over Pink Lagoon and people say ‘why have you changed the colour’ and I saw it’s raw and they say ‘are you sure?’

‘I hope the viewer can appreciate the beauty.

‘And I hope the Yankees see another side of Australia other than Bondi Beach. 

Boz said: 'An aerial shot over Pink Lagoon and people say 'why have you changed the colour' and I saw it's raw and they say 'are you sure?' (pictured is a work titled 'Pink Salt'

Boz said: ‘An aerial shot over Pink Lagoon and people say ‘why have you changed the colour’ and I saw it’s raw and they say ‘are you sure?’ (pictured is a work titled ‘Pink Salt’

Describing her photographic style as fine art and travel Boz said she wanted the American audience to 'see a side of Australia that's not advertised as much' (pictured is 'Where the Wild Things Are')

Describing her photographic style as fine art and travel Boz said she wanted the American audience to ‘see a side of Australia that’s not advertised as much’ (pictured is ‘Where the Wild Things Are’)

After leaving her career as a paparazzi photographer, Boz says she had to learn and adapt a new range of skills to the helicopter photography (pictured is her work titled 'Eruption')

After leaving her career as a paparazzi photographer, Boz says she had to learn and adapt a new range of skills to the helicopter photography (pictured is her work titled ‘Eruption’)

‘My photographic style is from fine art and travel and what I hope to achieve is the Americans can see a side that’s not advertised as much.’

Boz says she hopes the work showcases the lesser known areas of Australia such as Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania. 

‘There’s much more to it than just coastal lands.’

After leaving her career as a paparazzi photographer, Boz says she had to learn and adapt a new range of skills.

But at $60-$80 per minute depending on the aircraft, it can become a costly business when it does not quite go to plan

But at $60-$80 per minute depending on the aircraft, it can become a costly business when it does not quite go to plan

The transition to aerial photography was an expensive one and was something she had to learn on the job which led to some costly mistakes

The transition to aerial photography was an expensive one and was something she had to learn on the job which led to some costly mistakes

'It was a whole new world. Doing a concert snap, red carpet is a whole different world than a helicopter with constant shake to shutter speed,' she said

‘It was a whole new world. Doing a concert snap, red carpet is a whole different world than a helicopter with constant shake to shutter speed,’ she said

‘It was a whole new world. Doing a concert snap, red carpet is a whole different world than a helicopter with constant shake to shutter speed.’

But at $60-$80 per minute depending on the aircraft, it can become a costly business when it does not quite go to plan.

‘It was a costly transition and I made many mistakes,’ Boz said. ‘I spent $10,000 before I got the hang of it and there’s no book to learn from. It’s trial and error.

'I am so honoured and hope to make Australia proud and I've got beautiful shots and to represent our back yard in the creative hub of the world is incredible,' she said

‘I am so honoured and hope to make Australia proud and I’ve got beautiful shots and to represent our back yard in the creative hub of the world is incredible,’ she said

Poetry To The Eye was one of the first aerial pictures she took and she was amazed when it fetched $14,000 with the proceeds going to charity

Poetry To The Eye was one of the first aerial pictures she took and she was amazed when it fetched $14,000 with the proceeds going to charity

‘It did leave a hole in my pocket but it was worth the risk.

‘They’re all like my babies so it’s like asking a parent to pick a favourite child. But they all have stories behind them.’

She picked out one photograph called Poetry To The Eye which she explained came about after a blind man asked her to describe the ocean to him. 

It was one of the first pictures she took and she was amazed when it fetched $14,000 with the proceeds going to charity.

The charity was The Fred Hollows Foundation which helps more than 500 children with sight difficulties in Nepal regain their vision

The charity was The Fred Hollows Foundation which helps more than 500 children with sight difficulties in Nepal regain their vision

Follow Hulia on her journey in New York via her Instagram page 'Postcard From Australia'. The exhibition runs from June 6 to September 10 at the Monash Room at the Australian Consulate-General in New York

Follow Hulia on her journey in New York via her Instagram page ‘Postcard From Australia’. The exhibition runs from June 6 to September 10 at the Monash Room at the Australian Consulate-General in New York

The charity was The Fred Hollows Foundation which helps more than 500 children with sight difficulties in Nepal regain their vision allowing them to go to normal school and their mothers to go to work.

‘I can’t explain the feeling helping people with their vision back,’ Boz added.

Follow Hulia on her journey in New York via her Instagram page ‘Postcard From Australia’. The exhibition runs from June 6 to September 10 at the Monash Room at the Australian Consulate-General, 150 East 42nd Street, New York City, New York.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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