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Pilot is hurt as his 69-year-old Hawker Sea Fury plane crash lands

Pilot is hurt as his 69-year-old Hawker Sea Fury plane crash lands in a field and smashes into a tree

  • The 69-year-old fighter was on a routine flight from Duxford aerodrome 
  • The Hawker Sea Fury, which was built in 1951, crashed in Button End
  • The aircraft struck a tree and broke up as it attempted to land in a field 
  • Fortunately, the pilot and passenger managed to escape without major injury 

This dramatic photo shows the wreckage of a vintage British fighter plane after it crashed during a routine flight – leaving the pilot and a passenger injured.

The Hawker Sea Fury aircraft came down in a field at around 5.15pm  on Tuesday, after having to make a forced landing, leading to the plane sustaining a fuel leak.

The shocking photo shows the serious damage to the front of the plane, which appears to have been severed in two by the cockpit as it seemingly struck a tree on its way down.

The Hawker Sea Fury, pictured, broke into several pieces after it crash landed on Tuesday 

The aircraft struck a tree as it tried to land in a field some five miles from Duxford aerodrome

The aircraft struck a tree as it tried to land in a field some five miles from Duxford aerodrome

The pilot and passenger were able to escape from the aircraft with minor injuries

The pilot and passenger were able to escape from the aircraft with minor injuries 

The pilot and a passenger both received medical attention at the scene, in Button End near Duxford, Cambridgeshire, after sustaining minor injuries in the crash.

And the Imperial War Museum in Duxford confirmed yesterday afternoon that the plane had taken off from Duxford.

In a statement, IWM Duxford said: ‘There has been an incident involving a Sea Fury aircraft which departed from Duxford airfield this afternoon on a routine flight.

‘The aircraft had to undertake a forced landing, the pilot and passenger are receiving medical attention for minor injuries.

‘The aircraft sustained significant damage and a fuel leak.

‘An IWM Duxford fire team with specialist equipment and knowledge assisted Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service at the scene.’

The Hawker Sea Fury T.20 G-INVN ‘Invincible’ is operated by the Norwegian Spitfire Foundation.

The Air Accident Investigation Branch has begun trying to determine what caused the crash

The Air Accident Investigation Branch has begun trying to determine what caused the crash

The aircraft, which was manufactured in 1951, suffered extensive damage in the crash

The aircraft, which was manufactured in 1951, suffered extensive damage in the crash 

The aircraft suffered engine failure shortly after take off in July 1990 and made a wheels-up landing before it was repaired

The aircraft suffered engine failure shortly after take off in July 1990 and made a wheels-up landing before it was repaired 

The Hawker Sea Fury was manufactured in 1951 and sold to the German Ministry of Defence in 1957 to tow targets

The Hawker Sea Fury was manufactured in 1951 and sold to the German Ministry of Defence in 1957 to tow targets 

The Sea Fury operated out of Duxford Aerodrome and offered members of the public an opportunity to fly in a historic war bird

The Sea Fury operated out of Duxford Aerodrome and offered members of the public an opportunity to fly in a historic war bird

Police secured the crash scene until accident investigators could arrive at the site

Police secured the crash scene until accident investigators could arrive at the site 

The aircraft took off from Duxford aerodrome and flew for around 13 minutes until it crashed some five miles from the runway

The aircraft took off from Duxford aerodrome and flew for around 13 minutes until it crashed some five miles from the runway

According to the Foundation’s website, the aircraft was manufactured in 1951 – and this is not the first crash the aircraft has suffered.

In July 1990, it suffered engine failure shortly after take-off and made a wheels-up forced landing in a field near Castle Cary, Somerset.

The fuselage broke into three sections on collision with tree.

The remains initially went to New Zealand, and then later to Wisconsin, USA and then California, USA.

The aircraft was shipped back to Duxford in May 2009 – and was re-registered with a new engine and propeller in July 2018. 

The aircraft was brought back to service following its previous accident in 1990

The aircraft was brought back to service following its previous accident in 1990

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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