News, Culture & Society

Plans for zip wires across the Lake District shot down


Buying or leasing a car in the UK? Check MOT of car before you do.

It is a Unesco world heritage site, renowned for its idyllic landscape and tranquillity. So the idea of screaming thrill seekers hurtling across a Lake District beauty spot on a series of zip wires was always likely to spark controversy.

And it has now emerged that plans to install the £1.8million activity hub over Thirlmere reservoir have been shot down following objections from the Ministry of Defence.

The MoD said the zip wires would endanger fighter pilots who practise low-level flying over the national park, prompting the plans to be abandoned.

The MoD said the zip wires would endanger fighter pilots who practise low-level flying over the national park, prompting the plans to be abandoned

Cumbria Tourism and the Lake District park partnership business task force backed the project, saying it would boost the local economy. Pictured is an artist's impression of the plans

Cumbria Tourism and the Lake District park partnership business task force backed the project, saying it would boost the local economy. Pictured is an artist’s impression of the plans

Treetop Trek, an outdoor adventure company, had said that the installation of eight of the longest zip wire rides in the UK would bring younger tourists to the park. The zip wires would have been up to 1,200m long and riders would have travelled twice over the water at heights of up to 130m.

Cumbria Tourism and the Lake District park partnership business task force backed the project, saying it would boost the local economy.

But charities including Friends of the Lake District and the Wainwright Society, along with Caro-line Quentin, the actress and president of Campaign for National Parks, opposed the scheme, saying it would spoil the landscape.

The Lake District National Park Authority said that it had received 3,676 emails and letters de-nouncing the plans. It also received a petition opposing the project signed by more than 14,000 people, but only 164 emails and letters supporting the zip wire.

Writing in The Daily Mail, Labour peer and broadcaster Melvyn Bragg, who lives in High Ireby near Bassenthwaite Lake, said the project was a ‘monstrosity’.

Mike Turner, Treetop Trek’s managing director, had previously said that the park ‘shouldn’t be preserved in aspic’. But yesterday Mr Turner announced the plans had been withdrawn.

‘We made it clear from the beginning that we would not propose a scheme that was not support-ed by the MoD,’ he said.

The Lake District National Park Authority said that it had received 3,676 emails and letters de-nouncing the plans. It also received a petition opposing the project signed by more than 14,000 people, but only 164 emails and letters supporting the zip wire

The Lake District National Park Authority said that it had received 3,676 emails and letters de-nouncing the plans. It also received a petition opposing the project signed by more than 14,000 people, but only 164 emails and letters supporting the zip wire

A ministry spokesman said: ‘Thirlmere is used by the RAF for low-flying training as part of an agreement with the Lake District National Park Authority. 

‘After reviewing the planning document we have determined that the potential impact makes it necessary for us to object to the pro-posals.’

The Open Spaces Society, the Campaign for National Parks, Friends of the Lake District and the National Trust welcomed the decision to withdraw the project. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.