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Poll finds majority of Britons believe racism is rife

Nearly four in five black people say they have suffered racial abuse in the UK and more than a THIRD believe level of racism has got worse during their lifetimes, ITV poll reveals

  • New poll found that 77% of black participants have experienced racist abuse 
  • Majority of Britons believe that racism has stayed the same or gotten worse
  • 80% of black people say they have been asked ‘where they are really from’

A new poll has found that nearly four in five black people say they have suffered racial abuse in the UK. 

Nearly a third of black people said that racism has gotten worse in their lifetime, while the majority of Britons believe that racism is rife in the UK. 

Nearly two-thirds of the population think there is a ‘fair amount’ or ‘great deal’ of racism in the UK, according to the study.  

Nearly a third of black people said that racism has gotten worse in their lifetime, while the majority of Britons believe that racism is rife in the UK

It also found that black respondents are twice as likely as white respondents to say that racism is widespread. 

In a bleak view of racism in the UK, the poll found that 77% of black people say they have experienced racial abuse or slurs in person. 

55 percent of participants of ethnic minority backgrounds said racism had stayed the same or worsened in their lifetime, according to the study which was carried out by polling consultancy Number Cruncher Politics. 

The survey, which was conducted for ITV’s ‘Stephen Lawrence: Has Britain Changed?’, also found that 69 percent of ethnic minority respondents and 80 percent of black people say they have been asked ‘where they are really from’. 

Of the black people in the ethnic minority group polled, 34 percent said the level of racism in Britain has increased.

The poll comes after the death of George Floyd in the US sparked widespread Black Lives Matter protests in the UK

The poll comes after the death of George Floyd in the US sparked widespread Black Lives Matter protests in the UK

Meanwhile 25 percent said it has decreased and 30 percent said they had not seen much change. 

In comparison, nearly 39 percent of white participants said racism had decreased in their lifetimes, 27 percent said it had increased and 24 percent said it had stayed the same. 

53 percent of ethnic minority people and 76 percent of black people who participated in the polling said they feel they have been viewed with suspicion, for example when in a shop, while 32 percent of ethnic minority respondents said they had experienced violence or threats of violence. 

55 percent of participants of ethnic minority backgrounds said racism had stayed the same or worsened in their lifetime. In comparison, nearly 39 percent of white participants said racism had decreased in their lifetimes, 27 percent said it had increased and 24 percent said it had stayed the same

55 percent of participants of ethnic minority backgrounds said racism had stayed the same or worsened in their lifetime. In comparison, nearly 39 percent of white participants said racism had decreased in their lifetimes, 27 percent said it had increased and 24 percent said it had stayed the same

68 percent of the overall population polled strongly or generally support using education as a means of combating racism.

68 percent of white people, 68 percent of ethnic minority respondents and 78 percent of black people agreed that there should be an increased focus on British history, including around the empire, in the school curriculum. 

There is a split in opinion among racial groups on whether or not the Black Lives Matter movement has advanced the cause of racial equality.

White people are most likely to think it has not (44 percent), with 33 percent saying it has, and 23 percent who don’t know. People from minority ethnic backgrounds disagree, with 43 percent saying it has, 30 percent saying it has not, and 27 percent who don’t know. Black people more strongly feel it has (56 percent) vs just 23 percent who believe it has not, and 22 percent who don’t know.

The poll comes after the death of George Floyd in the US sparked widespread Black Lives Matter protests in the UK, with many calling for an end to racism and police brutality. 

Matt Singh, founder of Number Cruncher Politics, said: ‘This research sheds new light on how people view racism in modern Britain, their lived experience, and what they think should and shouldn’t change.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk