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Price of coffee and lunch to skyrocket 20 per cent as Australia’s hospitality industry struggles

Price of coffee and lunch to skyrocket by as much as 20 PER CENT as cafes battle staff shortages and rises in the price of popular foods

  • Businesses across nation have rolled out higher prices across their menu range
  • Price hikes are expected to become more common across hospitality industry
  • Cafes and restaurants are battling staff shortages and soaring ingredient costs
  • Industry experts warn that customers will see menu items cost 20 per cent more


Customers are in for a bitter shock with the price of coffee and lunch set to skyrocket by as much as 20 per cent as cafes battle staff shortages and an increase in the price of popular foods.

Many businesses across the nation have rolled out higher prices on their menu and it’s expected to continue as dining out gets more pricey.

Esther Sun runs Mum’s Burger Kitchen in Melbourne’s eastern suburb of Boronia and has had to charge customers two dollars more to grab a tasty gourmet burger from her restaurant.

Customers are in for a bitter shock with the price of coffee and lunch set to skyrocket by as much as 20 per cent due as cafes battle staff shortages and an increase in the price of popular foods (Pictured: Diners enjoy a meal at a café in Sydney)

A 20 cent increase in bread rolls combined with a four dollar rise in the cost of beef per kilogram and the soaring price of charcoal used to cook the patties has made things more difficult for Ms Sun.

‘The cost of making a burger over the past 20 months has doubled,’ Ms Sun told The Sydney Morning Herald.

The burger restaurant owner noted the price hikes are also being worsened by the inflation in costs of hiring staff in a Covid-affected society.

Employees at the burger joint are now paid five dollars more than the award rate an hour after Ms Sun struggled to find staff.

Ms Sun noted that she only received three interested individuals for the last job vacancy she advertised.

Wes Lambert, the Chief Executive Officer of Restaurant and Catering Australia warned that patrons will continue to see an increase in menu item prices in the new year (Pictured: A woman grabbing a coffee from a café in Sydney)

Wes Lambert, the Chief Executive Officer of Restaurant and Catering Australia warned that patrons will continue to see an increase in menu item prices in the new year (Pictured: A woman grabbing a coffee from a café in Sydney)

Esther Sun runs Mum¿s Burger Kitchen in Melbourne¿s eastern suburb of Boronia and has had to charge customers two dollars more to grab a tasty gourmet burger (pictured) from her restaurant

Esther Sun runs Mum’s Burger Kitchen in Melbourne’s eastern suburb of Boronia and has had to charge customers two dollars more to grab a tasty gourmet burger (pictured) from her restaurant

Gideon Markham, who has run Monarch Cakes in St Kilda for over 25 years, has increased his coffee prices by 50 cents as he believed he didn’t have a choice.

The long-time cake shop owner said the hospitality industry has suffered massive blows with Covid-19 lockdowns and admitted that he would soon be forced to charge customers more for menu items in the new year.

‘We have tried to provide a bit of joy for people and remained open for takeaway during lockdowns, but it is getting very, very difficult. Our street is very quiet. We are hoping the borders reopen soon and the tourists return,’ Mr Markham said.

Wes Lambert, the Chief Executive Officer of Restaurant and Catering Australia warned that patrons would soon be charged an extra 20 per cent for popular menu items. 

The burger restaurant owner also noted that the price hikes are also caused by the inflation in costs of hiring staff in a Covid affected society

The burger restaurant owner also noted that the price hikes are also caused by the inflation in costs of hiring staff in a Covid affected society

‘Patrons will begin to notice that their favourite meals will become dearer as we head into 2022 and the critical workforce shortage rages on,’ Mr Lambert said.

He added that restaurants and cafes now have to fork out an extra $20 more an hour for staff due to the difficulties of finding keen workers.

Mr Lambert has campaigned for skilled workers visas to be accelerated to get the hospitality industry back on its feet as about 100,000 jobs in the industry are vacant.

Karma Lord from the United Workers Union noted that lockdown forced a lot of staff to walk away from hospitality work due to insecure employment and poor environments.

Ms Lord has predicted that the rise in pay will soon fall and incentives will disappear for staff once the industry is able to fill vacant positions.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk