News, Culture & Society

Prince William looks dashing in a royal blue suit as he attends the Tusk Conservation Awards

The Duke of Cambridge looked in good spirits this evening as he stepped out in London for the Tusk Conservation Awards – just hours before the BBC’s new documentary about the warring Princes William and Harry will air.

Prince William, 39, looked dashing in a royal blue suit with a white shirt and textured tie as he arrived at the BFI Southbank in the British capital to celebrate Africa’s leading wildlife protectors.

It comes amid the BBC’s decision to release a two-part documentary hosted by anti-monarchist Amol Rajan about Prince William and Prince Harry’s ‘tumultuous’ relationship after Megxit as the royals and their lawyers threatened to go to war with the corporation over ‘disputed’ claims in the show. 

The Duke of Cambridge, the Queen and Prince Charles are reportedly threatening to boycott the broadcaster over the two-part series believed to contain ‘incendiary’ claims about the brothers smearing each other in the press and a row over whether the BBC failed to give the royals a proper right of reply.

The monarch and her heirs are together expected to collectively complain to regulator Ofcom for the first time in history, with lawyers braced to launch action after it begins at 9pm tonight.

Buckingham Palace is also said to be concerned that avowed republican Amol Rajan, who once called the monarchy ‘absurd’, was chosen to present the BBC2 show, called The Princes and the Press.

Pictured, Tusk Director of Programmes, Sarah Watson, The Duke of Cambridge and Tusk chief executive Charles Mayhew

The Duke of Cambridge (pictured left) looked in good spirits this evening as he stepped out in London for the Tusk Conservation Awards – just hours before the BBC’s new documentary about the warring Princes William and Harry will air. Pictured right, Tusk Director of Programmes, Sarah Watson, The Duke of Cambridge and Tusk chief executive Charles Mayhew

Prince William (pictured), 39, looked dashing in a royal blue suit with a white shirt and textured tie as he arrived at the BFI Southbank in the British capital to celebrate Africa's leading wildlife protectors

Prince William (pictured), 39, looked dashing in a royal blue suit with a white shirt and textured tie as he arrived at the BFI Southbank in the British capital to celebrate Africa’s leading wildlife protectors

The highly anticipated Tusk Awards, hosted by Kate Silverton, was able to return as a face-to-face event after being held virtually last year due to the pandemic.

Since Prince William launched the annual ceremony in 2013, the achievements of Africa’s unsung heroes who lead conservation efforts have been given recognition.

The Duke presented each of the winners their awards, before making a short speech. He will also attend a reception with key members and supporters of Tusk Trust, as well as the winners of this years’ awards to hear more about their vital work on the frontline of conservation efforts in Africa. 

As Royal Patron of Tusk Trust, Prince William has long been a supporter of the charity’s efforts and has taken part in their annual awards several times. For last year’s virtual ceremony, he recorded a video message congratulating the winners. 

Meanwhile, the BBC2 show The Princes and the Press, is being edited right up until broadcast and may repeat ‘disputed’ allegations that the siblings briefed smears against each other to the press via their aides.   

It comes amid the BBC's decision to release a two-part documentary hosted by anti-monarchist Amol Rajan about Prince William (pictured) and Prince Harry's 'tumultuous' relationship after Megxit as the royals and their lawyers threatened to go to war with the corporation over 'disputed' claims in the show

It comes amid the BBC’s decision to release a two-part documentary hosted by anti-monarchist Amol Rajan about Prince William (pictured) and Prince Harry’s ‘tumultuous’ relationship after Megxit as the royals and their lawyers threatened to go to war with the corporation over ‘disputed’ claims in the show

The Duke of Cambridge (pictured centre with Sarah Watson and Tusk chief executive Charles Mayhew), the Queen and Prince Charles are reportedly threatening to boycott the broadcaster over the two-part series believed to contain 'incendiary' claims about the brothers smearing each other in the press and a row over whether the BBC failed to give the royals a proper right of reply

The Duke of Cambridge (pictured centre with Sarah Watson and Tusk chief executive Charles Mayhew), the Queen and Prince Charles are reportedly threatening to boycott the broadcaster over the two-part series believed to contain ‘incendiary’ claims about the brothers smearing each other in the press and a row over whether the BBC failed to give the royals a proper right of reply

The monarch and her heirs are together expected to collectively complain to regulator Ofcom for the first time in history, with lawyers braced to launch action after it begins at 9pm tonight. Pictured, Prince William at the Tusk Awards

The monarch and her heirs are together expected to collectively complain to regulator Ofcom for the first time in history, with lawyers braced to launch action after it begins at 9pm tonight. Pictured, Prince William at the Tusk Awards

Earlier this year William attacked the BBC after its failings were exposed surrounding the Martin Bashir Panorama interview with his mother Diana, which the Duke of Cambridge branded ‘deceitful’. 

Claims by Omid Scobie that William and his staff leaked a story about Harry’s mental health were cut from ITV film Harry and William: What Went Wrong? hours before it was broadcast in July after the claim was rebutted by Kensington Palace. 

Royal commentator Richard Fitzwilliams told MailOnline: ‘The decision of the Queen, Prince Charles and Prince William to make their reported concerns about the two part BBC programme tonight so public, makes it clear that they believe the programmes may contain incendiary material.

‘The reported protests from the Palace obviously run the risk of increasing the viewing figures, but clearly the content may be such that the Palace feels that the public should be warned that, if they watch, they are seeing a point of view which may be strongly disputed’. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk