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Property guru reveals tips and common mistakes of people first getting into the marker

Owning a home can be a pipe dream – especially for an expelled high school student who left home at the age of 17.  

But Sasha Hopkins is living proof the dream is well within reach for just about anyone.  

Mr Hopkins was booted from his Queensland school as a teenager for stealing computers, before he moved into a caravan in his mate’s backyard and worked a minimum-wage job.

In the 14 years since, the now 31-year-old has amassed a whopping $55million property empire. 

This is his story.    

Sasha Hopkins turned his life around after being expelled at 17 for trying to steal computers from school, living in a caravan and working a minimum-wage job to having a $55million property portfolio. Pictured: with wife Lana

Mr Hopkins (pictured) built his empire after he was expelled from school and moved out of his parent's house in Noosa, Queensland, at the age of 17

Mr Hopkins (pictured) built his empire after he was expelled from school and moved out of his parent’s house in Noosa, Queensland, at the age of 17

At 17, Mr Hopkins worked for $9 an hour, potting plants at a local nursery. He said he received about $270 a week for his labour. Soon after, he had a 'lightbulb moment' and realised he wanted more from life. Pictured: Brisbane town house in his portfolio

At 17, Mr Hopkins worked for $9 an hour, potting plants at a local nursery. He said he received about $270 a week for his labour. Soon after, he had a ‘lightbulb moment’ and realised he wanted more from life. Pictured: Brisbane town house in his portfolio

At 17, Mr Hopkins worked for $9-an-hour, potting plants at a local nursery.

He took home about $270 a week for his labour.

Months later, he had a ‘lightbulb moment’ and realised he wanted more from life. 

He went back to finish school in Melbourne and started working overtime to save as much as he could – investing some of his savings in the share market.

By the time he was 21, Mr Hopkins was able to afford a deposit for his first property, a piece of land outside Hobart which he bought for $300,000. 

Within just eight years his portfolio was worth $9million, and in the last two years alone his empire has grown to more than five times that size. 

‘I am probably one of the most action-taking, aggressive people I know,’ the father-of-two told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘I continue to educate myself, surround myself with the right people and put myself to the test and buy property after property.’

Mr Hopkins said he goes after what he wants and has managed to maintain and repeat his success. Pictured: with wife Lana

Mr Hopkins said he goes after what he wants and has managed to maintain and repeat his success. Pictured: with wife Lana

Mr Hopkins, who has since turned his mind to developments rather than purchasing single properties, said he's a big believer in practicing what he preaches. Pictured: Bell Park, Vic property

Mr Hopkins, who has since turned his mind to developments rather than purchasing single properties, said he’s a big believer in practicing what he preaches. Pictured: Bell Park, Vic property

Mr Hopkins said the younger generation need to 'do things differently' to crack the property market. Pictured: Corio home

Mr Hopkins said the younger generation need to ‘do things differently’ to crack the property market. Pictured: Corio home

Mr Hopkins, who has turned his mind to developments rather than purchasing single properties, said he’s a big believer in practising what he preaches. 

‘In terms of exactly how I did it, it’s just a combination of continuing to succeed in businesses and continuing to do lots of development projects and buy property at a rapid rate,’ he said.

‘Once you crack the code it becomes easier, and your portfolio grows faster.’

He said the younger generation need to ‘do things differently’ to crack into the market.  

‘Unfortunately in this day and age relying on buying one property that is your home and paying down the debt for most of your life and hoping you will retire one day does not work,’ he said. 

He revealed his tips for those wanting to break into the market for the first time - including not making decisions out of fear

He revealed his tips for those wanting to break into the market for the first time – including not making decisions out of fear

Mr Hopkins said: 'Once you crack the code it becomes easier, and your portfolio grows faster.' Pictured: Brisbane townhouse

Mr Hopkins said: ‘Once you crack the code it becomes easier, and your portfolio grows faster.’ Pictured: Brisbane townhouse 

Mr Hopkins said there is a lot of ‘noise’ for first-time buyers between the media and friends and family – all of which they should ignore.  

‘It is very hard to cut through the noise and because there is so much it may lead to people either not making a decision or making one out of fear,’ he said.

‘This can people emotional and lead them to make the wrong decision because they don’t have the right guidance or research.’

Mr Hopkins advised first-time buyers to educate themselves, seek out a mentor with proven success and have a plan that suits where you are and what you want.

Mr Hopkins said the most important tips is to educate yourself, seek out a mentor who is succeeding currently and having a plan that suits where you are and what you want

Mr Hopkins said the most important tips is to educate yourself, seek out a mentor who is succeeding currently and having a plan that suits where you are and what you want

At 17, Mr Hopkins worked for $9 an hour, potting plants at a local nursery. He said he received about $270 a week for his labour. Soon after, he had a 'lightbulb moment' and realised he wanted more from life. Pictured: one of Brisbane properties in his portfolio

At 17, Mr Hopkins worked for $9 an hour, potting plants at a local nursery. He said he received about $270 a week for his labour. Soon after, he had a ‘lightbulb moment’ and realised he wanted more from life. Pictured: one of Brisbane properties in his portfolio

The founder of the A Team Property Group said there are also a lot of common mistakes people make when investing for the first time. Pictured: Brisbane town house in his portfolio

The founder of the A Team Property Group said there are also a lot of common mistakes people make when investing for the first time. Pictured: Brisbane town house in his portfolio

Mr Hopkins, who founded the A Team Property Group said there are also a lot of common mistakes people make when investing for the first time.

He said the number one mistake is when people get emotional when buying a property to invest in.

‘They might get emotional because they may not live in the home themselves, but investment is about the facts, figures and data. It has nothing to do with whether you want to live in the property,’ he said.

He said the number one mistake is when people get emotional when buying a property to invest in

He said the number one mistake is when people get emotional when buying a property to invest in

He said off the back of that it may cause people to purchase properties in areas they know - or even the same suburb so they can drive by it - but this severely limits you. Pictured: Wavell Heights home

He said off the back of that it may cause people to purchase properties in areas they know – or even the same suburb so they can drive by it – but this severely limits you. Pictured: Wavell Heights home

He said emotion may cause people to purchase properties in areas they know – or even the same suburb so they can drive by it – but brings limit to property success.

‘There are 11 million properties in Australia, it’s unlikely the one in the same suburb as you is the right one,’ he said.  

Mr Hopkins said another common mistake is treating property investment like a get rich quick scheme instead of putting in the hard yards.

‘Property investment isn’t something that will set you free overnight,’ he said.

‘But if you put in a good ten years of commitment and continuous action taking, hard work and some sacrifice – I will guarantee you will  be able to set yourself up for the rest of your life.’  

Mr Hopkins said another mistake people make is treating property investment like a get rich scheme instead of putting in the hard yards

Mr Hopkins said another mistake people make is treating property investment like a get rich scheme instead of putting in the hard yards

In the last two years Mr Hopkins (pictured with his wife and their eldest child) has grown his property portfolio by more than $45million - but he says he won't be stopping any time soon

In the last two years Mr Hopkins (pictured with his wife and their eldest child) has grown his property portfolio by more than $45million – but he says he won’t be stopping any time soon

'I don't need to work another day in my life but when people ask me [why] because I want to provide the absolute best life for my wife and two children, for the people I employ and everyone in my life,' Mr Hopkins (pictured with his wife and two children)  said

 ‘I don’t need to work another day in my life but when people ask me [why] because I want to provide the absolute best life for my wife and two children, for the people I employ and everyone in my life,’ Mr Hopkins (pictured with his wife and two children)  said

Mr Hopkins said everyone has an opinion on property – but that is coloured by their own experience and may not be relevant or helpful for the new investor.  

In the last two years Mr Hopkins has grown his property portfolio by more than $45million – but he says he won’t be stopping any time soon.

‘I don’t need to keep doing what I am doing, I don’t need to work another day in my life but when people ask me [why] because I want to provide the absolute best life for my wife and two children and everyone in my life,’ he said.

‘I also love doing what I do and I love challenging myself – I could never be that guy sitting on the beach.’ 

Mr Hopkins (interior of one of his properties pictured) said he wants to leave a legacy for his children and act as a role model

Mr Hopkins (interior of one of his properties pictured) said he wants to leave a legacy for his children and act as a role model

SASHA HOPKIN’S TIPS AND COMMON MISTAKES PEOPLE MAKE WHEN INVESTING FOR THE FIRST TIME 

TIPS

  • Educate yourself
  • Treat investing like a business because if you do it well enough it will become one
  • Surround yourself with experts 

COMMON MISTAKES

  • Getting emotional
  • Only going with what you know – focusing on one suburb or area 
  • Treating property as a ‘get rich quick’ scheme 
  • Not taking the right advice – or getting advice from the wrong people

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk