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Prostate cancer ‘crisis’ due to a shortage of specialist nurses, charity warns 

Thousands of men could be left to face the effects of prostate cancer alone due to a shortage of specialist nurses, charity warns

  • Prostate Cancer UK claims two-fifths of urology cancer nurse specialists may go
  • The charity described the situation as a ‘ticking time bomb’ for cancer patients 
  • Now 500 nurses need to be recruited within ten years to address shortfall, it said

Thousands of men could be left to face the effects of prostate cancer alone due to a shortage of specialist nurses, a charity has warned.

Prostate Cancer UK says that two-fifths of urology cancer nurse specialists are approaching retirement or plan to leave the job in the next decade.

The charity described the situation as a ‘ticking time bomb’ which could leave many men without vital support.

It said a further 500 nurses need to be recruited within ten years to address the shortfall.

Prostate Cancer UK says that two-fifths of urology cancer nurse specialists are approaching retirement or plan to leave the job in the next decade (stock image)

Heather Blake, director of support and influencing at Prostate Cancer, says if men can't access nurses they 'might just end up living with incontinence or sexual function problems and have a lower quality of life'

Heather Blake, director of support and influencing at Prostate Cancer, says if men can’t access nurses they ‘might just end up living with incontinence or sexual function problems and have a lower quality of life’

‘These nurses are absolutely critical,’ Heather Blake, director of support and influencing at Prostate Cancer UK said. 

‘It can be lonely dealing with the side effects of prostate cancer treatment. If these men can’t access nurses, they might just end up living with incontinence or sexual function problems and have a lower quality of life.’

In England, 463 cancer nurse specialists work with men affected by prostate cancer, providing advice on treatment options and support dealing with side-effects. 

Almost a third of the 94 nurse specialists surveyed said they were dealing with more than 600 patients.

Simon Lord from Oxfordshire received support from a specialist nurse after being diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010.

‘Clinical nurses are so important to support men like me,’ he said. ‘They ease your concerns in ways that cannot be measured.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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