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Protective hoods for airplane seats could keep passengers safe during the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus has grounded planes across the world, but an Italian firm is working on a concept that allows for safe travel during the pandemic.

The renders, created by Avio Interiors, include protective hoods that create a cocoon around each seat to add a buffer between passengers. 

The drawings also show a middle seat turned backwards and surrounded by a plastic shield, which not only separates travels but provides the middle seat occupant with more room.

These concepts may be the answer to following social distancing rules without using measures that would leave empty seats on the plane. 

 

The coronavirus has grounded planes across the world, but an Italian firm is working on a concept that allows for safe travel during the pandemic. The renders, created by Avio Interiors, include protective hoods that create a cocoon around each seat and act like a buffer between passengers.

The coronavirus, which began spreading in December 2019, led to a sharp reduction in air travel demand in the US as early as February.

The reduction in global airline capacity, measured by how many seats remain grounded, is now greater than after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, industry analysts say.

But Avio hopes that the world will again take to the skies and believes to have a concept to get it there.

The design was set to make its debut at the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Germany, but the event was canceled due to the virus.

The transparent plastic shield would act as a buffer in-between passengers, allowing them to be shielded from any germs or viruses the other may be carrying

The transparent plastic shield would act as a buffer in-between passengers, allowing them to be shielded from any germs or viruses the other may be carrying

The transparent plastic shield would act as a buffer in-between passengers, allowing them to be shielded from any germs or viruses the other may be carrying.

‘Glassafe’ is made of transparent material to make the entire cabin harmonious and aesthetically light, but perfectly fulfilling the objective of creating an isolated volume around the passenger in order to avoid or minimize contacts and interactions via air between passenger and passenger, so as to reduce the probability of contamination by viruses or other,’ Avio Interiors shares on its Instagram page.

The attachments can be added to existing airline seats, which is a cost-effective adjustment and may be the answer to maintaining social distancing policies officials have set in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

The attachments can be added to existing airline seats, which is a cost-effective adjustment and may be the answer to maintaining social distancing policies officials have set in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus

The attachments can be added to existing airline seats, which is a cost-effective adjustment and may be the answer to maintaining social distancing policies officials have set in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus

‘The shield is shaped in such a way as to leave complete accessibility to the accessories normally installed on the back, such as tables, magazine pockets, coat hooks or other,’ the manufacturer states.

‘Glassafe’ can be supplied in opaque material or with different degrees of transparency, all easy cleaning.’

A separate render suggests turning the middle seat the opposite direction, which provides all three passengers with a protective barrier and the middle occupant more room than the traditional setup.

Called the ‘Janus’, this seat is named after the two-faced Roman god and, according to Avio, has the same cabin footprint as the original design.

However, airlines would have to adjust the rows and the placement might make it difficult to serve food or evacuate in case of emergency.

The company has patented both of these product proposals and says it is ready to go into production.

However, the concepts may not transition into the real world, as many airlines are suffering since having to ground planes over the past few months.

A separate render suggests turning the middle seat the opposite direction, which provides all three passengers with a protective barrier and the middle occupant more room than the traditional setup

A separate render suggests turning the middle seat the opposite direction, which provides all three passengers with a protective barrier and the middle occupant more room than the traditional setup

JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes says the plummet of global travel and airlines sales is ‘probably worse’ than the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks where the airline business saw a 30 percent drop in business. 

JetBlue airlines has seen a 20 percent drop in sales since the first case of coronavirus was confirmed in the US back in January.

Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic became the first to ask for a loan, which was more than 600 million.

Virgin Australia, which is 10 percent owned by Branson, collapsed with debts of $5billion after failing to secure a government loan of $1.5 billion.

Despite public anger at potential bailouts, industry experts have warned airline survival is entirely dependent on government’s investment, with some admitting that, even with public funds, it still might not be enough.

Others have questioned whether it is time for the government to refrain from bailing out airlines altogether.

Julie Palmer, partner at Begbies Traynor, told Mailonline: ‘During this time airlines will undoubtedly look to governments for bail outs, but the real question is whether governments will use up some of their dwindling supply of cash to bail out the airlines.

Chris Tarry, an aviation industry expert and adviser, said that governments must weigh up the economic benefits of bailing out airlines against the cost to the public.

He said: ‘Virgin Atlantic is not the first to ask for government help and won’t be the last. 

‘Governments however have to be very clear in what they are investing in and the probability of a return both financial and economic.’

He also warned: ‘After the pandemic, air travel will have changed structurally and it will take a very considerable time for the number of flights and passengers to reach previous level

‘At the present time it is impossible to predict when this might be.’

 



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