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Qantas and Jetstar will ditch paper boarding passes and switch to digital system to cut on waste

Qantas and Jetstar ditch paper boarding passes and switch to a digital-only system to cut down on waste

  • International passengers will be able to use their phones as boarding passes
  • Domestic flights already use a near-paperless boarding pass system via phones
  • Qantas Group plans to cut down on their waste by 75 per cent by the end of 2021 

Qantas and Jetstar are ditching paper boarding passes in favour of a digital-only system.  

The swap to digital passes is aimed at creating a more streamlined experience for passengers while cutting down on their 30,000 tonnes of annual waste by 75 per cent.

Single-use plastic items, plastic cups, cutlery sets, coffee cups and headset covers will also be replaced with more environmentally friendly alternatives.

 Qantas will replace its old paper boarding passes with a new digital-only system 

Qantas already uses near-paperless boarding for domestic flights via the Qantas smartphone app and tap-and-go smart card readers.

However, the new scheme will include international flights.  

Qantas Group Chief Executive Officer Alan Joyce said during the company’s half-yearly results that they believe the changes are the first step in reducing the amount of non-biodegradable items the company disposes of. 

‘In the process of carrying 50 million people each year, we deal with more than 30,000 tons of waste. That’s the same weight as about eighty 747 jumbos,’ said Mr Joyce.

‘It is quite literally a waste and we have a responsibility to our customers, shareholders and the company to reduce it.’ 

Qantas uses a near-paperless system for national flights but international will now be included

Qantas uses a near-paperless system for national flights but international will now be included

Qantas group aims to recycle, compost and reuse up to 75 per cent of their waste by 2021 

Qantas group aims to recycle, compost and reuse up to 75 per cent of their waste by 2021 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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