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Queensland Govt to ban pronged dog collars in the state

Controversial dog collars to be BANNED in Queensland as they ‘use pain as punishment’

  • The QLD Govt has announced it will be banning the use of pronged dog collars
  • The ban will be put forward as part of a series of changes to animal welfare laws
  • Others amendments include banning pig poisons and cauterising horse legs

Pronged dog collars are set to be banned in Queensland under new legislation put forward by the state government.

The proposed ban was announced by premier Annastacia Palaszczuk on social media on Sunday.

It will be put forward in parliament next week as part of a series of amendments to the state’s Animal Care and Protection Act to crack down on animal cruelty. 

Pronged dog collars are set to be banned in Queensland under new legislation put forward by the state government. (Pictured: A pronged collar around a dog’s neck) 

‘We’re passing legislation to crack down on the inhumane treatment of animals in Queensland,’ the premier wrote in her post. 

‘We know the majority of Queenslanders support tougher penalties and regulations against cruelty to animals.’

‘That’s why this week we’ll be debating animal welfare laws in the Queensland Parliament – an issue close to the hearts of so many Queenslanders,’ she added.

Agriculture minister Mark Furner clarified further details about the ban during a press conference later in the day. 

The ban was announced by premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (pictured) on social media on Sunday

The ban was announced by premier Annastacia Palaszczuk (pictured) on social media on Sunday

The metal collars inflict pain on dogs as a form of 'punishment' by tightening around their necks when pressure is applied. The blunted prongs pinch the dog's neck

The metal collars inflict pain on dogs as a form of ‘punishment’ by tightening around their necks when pressure is applied. The blunted prongs pinch the dog’s neck

‘Today we’re talking about changes to the use and possession of pronged collars on dogs, so they’ll be banned,’ Furner said.

‘A very inhumane practice in the way you can train dogs,’ he continued.

The metal collars inflict pain on dogs as a form of ‘punishment’ by tightening around their necks when pressure is applied. 

The individual holding the leash is able to pull the collar, with the blunted prongs pinching the animal’s neck. 

Animal welfare groups, such as the RSPCA, have been staunch advocates against the legality of the collars.

Agriculture minister Mark Furner (pictured) clarified further details about the ban during a press conference. He announced the state government will be banning the use of yellow phosphorus as feral pig poison as well as the practice of cauterising horse legs

Agriculture minister Mark Furner (pictured) clarified further details about the ban during a press conference. He announced the state government will be banning the use of yellow phosphorus as feral pig poison as well as the practice of cauterising horse legs

Minister Furner also announced the state government will be banning the use of yellow phosphorus as feral pig poison as well as the practice of cauterising horse legs.

The government will be giving animal inspectors more powers as well, with the possibility they’ll be able to issue on-the-spot fines in circumstances involving animal cruelty. 

More amendments are expected to be announced over the week. 

The changes come after the Queensland government announced in December 2020 it would be conducting an extensive review into its animal welfare laws. 

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk