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Racism declared public health crisis in San Bernardino County

Racism is declared a public health crisis in San Bernardino County where the infant mortality rate is DOUBLE for the black community – who also make up 21 per cent of the homeless despite being only 9 per cent of the county’s population

  • The Board of Supervisors approved the decision in a 5-0 vote during a Tuesday meeting, detailing the mass inequalities faced by the black community  
  • Officials noted that the infant mortality rate for the black population was double the rate of the rest the county 
  • Black people make up 21 per cent of the county’s homeless population, with homeownership for the community at under 43 per cent
  • They make up nine per cent of the population in San Bernardino 
  • Students are also suspended and expelled at more than twice the respective rates for all students and only have a college readiness rate of 30 percent 
  • The resolution notes that racism contributes to physical and behavioral health conditions
  • Officials added that racism has also given rise to ‘geographical segregation’ 
  • Resolution mentions nine ways in which the county will work to dismantle racism

Racism has been declared a public health crisis in San Bernardino, resulting in disparities in ‘family stability, health and mental wellness, education, employment, economic development, public safety, criminal justice and housing.’

The Board of Supervisors approved the decision in a 5-0 vote during a Tuesday meeting, detailing the mass inequalities faced by the black community in the county. 

Following weeks of demonstrations protesting the killing of George Floyd on May 25, the resolution notes that the ‘U.S. Census Bureau has documented a significant increase in anxiety and depression among black people nationally.’ 

Specifically in San Bernardino, officials noted that the infant mortality rate for the black population was double the rate of the rest the county. 

The Board of Supervisors approved the decision in a 5-0 vote during a Tuesday meeting, detailing the mass inequalities faced by the Black community in the county

And while black people only make up nine per cent of the entire county’s population, the community makes up 19 per cent of jail bookings and 38 per cent of juvenile detention facilities. 

Black people make up 21 per cent of the county’s homeless population, with homeownership for the community at under 43 per cent – whereas the county has 60 per cent homeownership overall. 

The resolution notes that racism contributes to physical and behavioral health conditions – including depression, maternal death, diabetes and more.

Officials added that racism has also given rise to ‘geographical segregation’ that has exposed ‘people of color to ‘lead poisoning, poor air quality, inadequate nutrition, and under-resourced recreational and healthcare facilities.’

Following weeks of demonstrations protesting the killing of George Floyd on May 25, the resolution notes that the 'U.S. Census Bureau has documented a significant increase in anxiety and depression among black people nationally' (Protests in Victorville)

Following weeks of demonstrations protesting the killing of George Floyd on May 25, the resolution notes that the ‘U.S. Census Bureau has documented a significant increase in anxiety and depression among black people nationally’ (Protests in Victorville)

Residents came to the Tuesday meeting and voiced their support of the resolution

Residents came to the Tuesday meeting and voiced their support of the resolution

Black students in the county have been failed in education, as well, with only 17 per cent found to be proficient in math – compared to 31 per cent of all students. 

When it comes to English and Language Arts, less than 35 per cent of black students are proficient – compared to 45 per cent of all students. 

Black students are also suspended and expelled at more than twice the respective rates for all students and only have a college readiness rate of 30 percent – compared to 44 per cent.

The resolution mentions nine ways in which the county will work to dismantle racism.

The resolution mentions nine ways in which the county will work to dismantle racism. Josie Gonzales, Fifth District Supervisor for the County of San Bernardino, voiced her support for the resolution

The resolution mentions nine ways in which the county will work to dismantle racism. Josie Gonzales, Fifth District Supervisor for the County of San Bernardino, voiced her support for the resolution

The county has now added ‘Equity’ to their Countywide Vision, which aims to capitalize ‘on the diversity of its people, it’s geography, and its economy to create a broad range of choices for its residents in how they live, work, and play.’ The Equity Element Group will now check for ways to address the impact and prevention of racism.

San Bernardino will work with justice agencies, using the Equity Element Group, to ensure ‘public safety is administered equitably.’ 

Diversity will be sought in the County Government workforce, the resolution also details. 

The county will advocate for the dismantling of systemic racism through the California State Association of Counties and the National Association of Counties. 

Additionally, San Bernardino will work with other organizations that are confronting racism. The county is currently considering joining the Government Alliance on Race and Equity.

They will also evaluate existing policies and place priority in policies that address health in an equitable way by ‘mitigating exposure to adverse childhood experiences.’

The county is encouraging the 24 towns and cities to adopt similar resolutions.   

The county is encouraging the 24 towns and cities to adopt similar resolutions and will be working with organizations to combat racism

The county is encouraging the 24 towns and cities to adopt similar resolutions and will be working with organizations to combat racism



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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