News, Culture & Society

Research predicts big changes for Australian houses – including fewer walls and no McMansions

Fewer walls, no McMansions and neighbours SHARING the same kitchen: Inside Australia’s homes of the future

  • Research suggests a shift towards the ‘sharing economy’ in Australian homes
  • Affordability and sustainability will change the way houses are designed  
  • Experts say housing trends are changing because of COVID-19 and the bushfires

New research suggests a major shift in the development of Australia’s homes, with a move away from stand alone McMansions to shared living with neighbours.

The ‘Future of Living Report’ from Allianz predicts a new ‘sharing economy’ will be the basis of the way homes are constructed in the future, driven by affordability and sustainability.

Experts believe housing trends will change faster than expected as a result of the financial strains brought on by COVID-19 and the bushfires. 

New research from Allianz suggests a major shift in the development of Australia’s homes, with a move away from stand alone McMansions to shared living with neighbours (Pictured: an artist’s impression of a future home)

The 'Future of Living Report' predicts a new 'sharing economy' will be the basis of the way homes are constructed in the future, driven by affordability and sustainability

The ‘Future of Living Report’ predicts a new ‘sharing economy’ will be the basis of the way homes are constructed in the future, driven by affordability and sustainability

The report, commissioned by Allianz in partnership with UTS, has revealed how socio-economic and environmental factors will affect house design and home-living.      

The future home will be centred around five major themes: shared living, managing climate, naturalised interiors, reusing materials and ‘austerity chic’. 

This means younger generations will be looking to build with locally sourced materials, like timber in place or brick or concrete.

There will also be a greater focus on establishing greenery throughout the interior and exterior of the home, essentially removing the walls to expand the garden all the way through the house.

While interior design will become a mismatched collection of items found between second-hand and mass-market furniture stores. 

Horticulturalist Jamie Durie – who is currently designing his own sustainable home – has created a prospective blueprint of what a home of the future could look like.

There will also be a greater focus on establishing greenery throughout the interior and exterior of the home, essentially removing the walls to expand the garden all the way through the house

There will also be a greater focus on establishing greenery throughout the interior and exterior of the home, essentially removing the walls to expand the garden all the way through the house

Horticulturalist Jamie Durie said the materials chosen and even the choice of plant locations will play a major role in the way homes are built

Horticulturalist Jamie Durie said the materials chosen and even the choice of plant locations will play a major role in the way homes are built

Mr Durie said the materials chosen and even the choice of plant locations will play a major role in the way homes are built.  

 ‘Taking it back to basics was a clear design message from the report, and one that benefits the environment. It’s not just what we build the house out of, it’s also what we surround the house with,’ Mr Drurie said.

‘Planting dense foliage around the side of the house, such as Australian native plants, not only looks great but can also stop hot weather from infiltrating the house.’ 

He said the choice of building materials will not only improve the aesthetics of the home but help to manage external factors such as lighting or heating.

‘Using locally-sourced timber when building our homes is another way to make better use of the earth’s limited resources and embrace the environment around us,’ he said.

‘By thinking how local nature, sunlight and ecosystems can enhance the design of our homes, we can feel good about making conscious decisions that benefit our futures.’ 

While interior design will become a mismatched collection of items found between second-hand and mass-market furniture stores

While interior design will become a mismatched collection of items found between second-hand and mass-market furniture stores

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.