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Ridley Road’s Tracy-Ann Oberman talks to Lorraine about social media trolling

Ridley Road’s Tracy-Ann Oberman has spoken about the abuse she has received online after fighting back at anti-Semitism in the Labour Party.

Oberman, 55, who appeared on ITV’s Lorraine today, was previously a member of the party but left over the decision not to revoke Ken Livingstone’s membership following allegations of antisemitism. She has since become a fearless fighter on Twitter against anti-Semitism

‘It comes from the left and the right and if you see an injustice I’ve always felt I needed to stand up and talk about it,’ explained Tracy-Ann. ‘But what’s frightening is a lot of people don’t go on that journey with you – but a lot of people do.

Lorraine, who branded the antisemitism as ‘frankly vile,’ went on to say that Tracy-Ann’s role as Nancy Malinovsky in BBC drama Ridley Road – which is set in post WWII Britain – will ‘educate people’ whilst they’re being entertained.   

Ridley Road’s Tracy-Ann Oberman (pictured), 55, appeared on ITV’s Lorraine today and spoke about the abuse she has received online after fighting back at anti-Semitism in the Labour Party

The actress discusses her Ridley Road character Nancy (pictured) and said she 'represents all of those women who are often at the forefront of battling these injustices but they get written out of the bigger narrative and story'

The actress discusses her Ridley Road character Nancy (pictured) and said she ‘represents all of those women who are often at the forefront of battling these injustices but they get written out of the bigger narrative and story’

‘I think at a time when Britain is re-looking at its colonial history and its world of slavery, to look at the British draw towards fascism over all of these different periods is really important – in the 30s, 40s and then in 62, to have Colin Jordan on the streets of Britain holding these massive rallies in Trafalgar Square…’

Tracy-Ann, who detailed the ‘massive support’ fascists received back then, added: ‘So soon after the Holocaust to have British people who had liberated those camps, calling for the end of the Jewish entity on the streets of London, it was terrifying.’

The ex-EastEnders actress went on to praise the work of the East End’s anti-fascist 62 Group – and called for them to be remembered because they ‘fought for other communities too.’

‘These were not Jewish characters as we’d often see,’ she said. ‘These were Jewish working-class characters. My grandparents grew up with them and knew the 62 Group and were part of the 62 group.’ 

During the show, Tracy-Ann, who plays Nancy in Ridley Road - which is set in post WWII Britain - also went on to discuss the BBC drama

During the show, Tracy-Ann, who plays Nancy in Ridley Road – which is set in post WWII Britain – also went on to discuss the BBC drama

Oberman (pictured, on Lorraine) was previously a member of the party but left over the decision not to revoke Ken Livingstone's membership following allegations of antisemitism

Oberman (pictured, on Lorraine) was previously a member of the party but left over the decision not to revoke Ken Livingstone’s membership following allegations of antisemitism

‘The police weren’t protecting them, their synagogues were being burnt down, they were being beat up in the street and no one was protecting them.

In the end, they were so angry they said: “We’re going to do this for ourselves.” And they formed this 62 vigilante group. And they went in and infiltrated Colin Jordan and they would find out what was going on as the drama shows.’   

Tracy-Ann went on to discuss her character Nancy, adding: ‘I think Nancy represents all of those women who are often at the forefront of battling these injustices but they get written out of the bigger narrative and story. So to have this very strong feisty, backbone of the 62 Group represented by Nancy, it’s very important.’ 

And it’s not the first time the ex-EastEnders star has opened up about the ‘disgusting bullying’ she has received online after fighting back at anti-Semitism.  

In August 2019, she criticised the BBC for including left-wing commentator Ash Sarkar among talking heads features in a documentary about the Third Reich.

The ex-EastEnders actress went on to praise the work of the East End’s anti-fascist 62 Group - and called for them to be remembered because they 'fought for other communities too.' Pictured, speaking to Lorraine

The ex-EastEnders actress went on to praise the work of the East End’s anti-fascist 62 Group – and called for them to be remembered because they ‘fought for other communities too.’ Pictured, speaking to Lorraine

Ms Sarkar sent her ‘solidarity’ to Ewa Jasiewicz after she sprayed ‘Free Gaza and Palestine’ on walls near the largest Jewish World War Two ghetto in Warsaw.

Tracy-Ann tweeted: ‘Dear Patrick Holland #BBC2 as someone who lost family during The Rise of The Nazis I am deeply disturbed that of all knowledgable experts/historians.

‘You use Ash Sarkar a woman who endorsed the spray painting of the remaining WarsawGhetto wall-an open grave for our families. Why?’

Ms Sarkar, senior editor at Novara media, ‘wholeheartedly rejects’ claims she is anti-Semitic.

In September 2018, she defended Jasiewicz and another’s decision to spray the walls of the Warsaw Ghetto with anti-Israel graffiti, insisting it was not ‘anti-Semitic’ but ‘anti-racist’.

On Twitter she replied: ‘I don’t see why my support for Boycotts, Divestment and Sanctions against the Israeli occupation of the West Bank should disqualify me from talking about the Communist Party of Germany, but hey, I guess we live in strange times.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk