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Robot security guards seen patrolling Tokyo metropolitan government building with on-board cameras

Robot security guards that look like R2-D2 are seen patrolling Tokyo metropolitan government building with on-board cameras and sensors that broadcast directly to humans

  • Three autonomous patrol robots are providing security at a Tokyo metropolitan government building 
  • The SQ-2 robots are produced by Seqsense in Japan and are needed due to labor shortages in Tokyo 
  • The robots have multiple cameras, move on predetermined routes and can produce 3-D maps of their surroundings 
  • ‘They look kind of intimidating with those things spinning on their heads,’ one reader told Japan Today

A team of three autonomous patrol robots are now providing security at the Tokyo metropolitan government building. 

The robots are SQ-2 models produced by Seqsense in Tokyo and they’re equipped with multiple cameras that can broadcast video directly to human security personnel at a central location. 

These robots look decidedly more R2-D2 than Robocop with spinning cameras on their heads that constantly whirl around and can make 3-D maps of their surroundings. 

 

The robots are SQ-2 models (seen above) produced by Seqsense in Tokyo and they’re equipped with cameras that can broadcast video directly to human security personnel

These robots look decidedly more R2-D2 than Robocop with spinning cameras on their heads that constantly whirl around and can make 3-D maps of their surroundings

These robots look decidedly more R2-D2 than Robocop with spinning cameras on their heads that constantly whirl around and can make 3-D maps of their surroundings

They do still have artificial intelligence capabilities that can detect people and other obstacles to avoid any collisions on the predetermined patrol routes. 

They even have hand sensors so that people in the space can request help from human guards, but they are not meant to fulfill all the duties of a regular human security guard. 

Instead, they’re meant to fill labor shortages at an affordable price. 

A manager with the Tokyo Metropolitan Government told Japan Today: ‘We introduced this system as a measure to solve a shortage of security personnel.’ 

A manager with the Tokyo Metropolitan Government told Japan Today : 'We introduced this system as a measure to solve a shortage of security personnel'

A manager with the Tokyo Metropolitan Government told Japan Today : ‘We introduced this system as a measure to solve a shortage of security personnel’

'Isn’t the R2-D2 model available?' a Japan Today reader joked regarding the patrol bots (seen above)

‘Isn’t the R2-D2 model available?’ a Japan Today reader joked regarding the patrol bots (seen above)

Readers of the Japanese publication had mixed reactions to the strange-looking security bots that roamed through the local government building’s lobby.

‘They look kind of intimidating with those things spinning on their heads,’ one said.

‘Isn’t the R2-D2 model available?’ another joked.

‘Is arming them for self-defense an option?’

‘Why not just put up a bunch of 360-degree cameras.’

‘There are a lot of robots like this in Otemachi, but they’re scarier than security guards if you see one at night.’

‘Just having cameras moving about is enough of a deterrent. They should use these in schools too,’ another suggested. 

‘Can’t you just kick it over?’

‘I wish they’d use one of those Boston Dynamics dogs,’ one person said, referencing the now famous and more intimidating robot dogs that have been used by police and fire departments.

The Seqsense robot seems quite different from what the public is expecting when Tesla Optimus, the humanoid robot being developed by Elon Musk’s company, is unveiled at AI Day September 30. 

That robot is intended for industrial and domestic uses and was designed to look like a human being, with limbs and human-like features.

‘The Tesla Bot is close to the height and weight of an adult, can carry or pick up heavy objects, walk fast in small steps, and the screen on its face is an interactive interface for communication with people. 

The Tesla bot, which would be 5’8 and weigh 125 pounds, is set to include the Autopilot computer used in the company’s electric cars, which will allow the humanoid to recognize real-world objects, although the robot will have its own customized sensors and actuators.

It will also be able to ‘deadlift’ up to 150 pounds, carry 45 pounds, walk 5 miles per hour and have human-like hands plus visual sensors giving it the ability to ‘see.’

Tesla’s Autopilot cameras will be fitted in the front of the bot’s head and its inner-workings will be powered by the company’s Full Self-Driving computer. The bots will be apparently operate through Tesla’s Full Self-Driving computer interface, which is what’s in the Tesla Model 3, X, S, Y and Roadster.

They even have hand sensors so that people in the space can request help from human guards, but they are not meant to fulfill all the duties of a regular human security guard

They even have hand sensors so that people in the space can request help from human guards, but they are not meant to fulfill all the duties of a regular human security guard

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk