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Rotting foxes and starving dogs are discovered at Polish ‘fur farm’

Rotting foxes and starving dogs have been discovered at a Polish suspected fur farm with bones jutting out of cruelly mistreated animals’ corpses. 

Of the animals that were still alive, which included wild foxes as well as domestic dogs, many were starving in filthy, rusting cages in Chojnow.

‘We were shocked,’ an investigator said. ‘It was appalling to see the animals in so much fear and distress.’

Open Cages, a British animal welfare charity, was investigating complaints into animal cruelty but were stunned to find such grisly abuse at what they believe is a fur farm. 

A terrified fox shrinks back in his cage as investigators and the Open Cages charity arrived to free foxes and dogs from the Polish alleged fur farm

Two of the farm's cages had rotting corpses inside, the bare bones of the animals just visible through disintegrating flesh (pictured: a dead fox)

Two of the farm’s cages had rotting corpses inside, the bare bones of the animals just visible through disintegrating flesh (pictured: a dead fox)

Also discovered at the farm were dogs, it is not clear whether they were being kept as domestic animals or whether they were being slaughtered like the foxes for their fur

Also discovered at the farm were dogs, it is not clear whether they were being kept as domestic animals or whether they were being slaughtered like the foxes for their fur

Two of the farm’s cages had rotting corpses inside, the bare bones of the animals just visible through disintegrating flesh. 

Of the animals that were still alive, six dogs and four foxes were immediately placed into veterinary care.

A second visit allowed the activists to rescue more animals – and now 21 have been saved in total.

It is already clear that at least one of the foxes will need an amputation, due to painful abscesses on its foot.

An investigator explained that for foxes and dogs to be kept in cramped cages – animals which naturally cover vast distances – is exceptionally depraved. 

A bone within the rotting corpse of a black-coated fox has become exposed from its body as it has been left to rot at the farm

A bone within the rotting corpse of a black-coated fox has become exposed from its body as it has been left to rot at the farm

A white and grey coated fox sits inside its tiny cage. An investigator explained that for foxes and dogs to be kept in cramped cages - animals which naturally cover vast distances - is exceptionally depraved.

A white and grey coated fox sits inside its tiny cage. An investigator explained that for foxes and dogs to be kept in cramped cages – animals which naturally cover vast distances – is exceptionally depraved.

A fox inside its cramped and rusting cage in Poland. 'For animals that are adapted to travel vast distances every day, living in a tight cage is torture,' an investigator said.

A fox inside its cramped and rusting cage in Poland. ‘For animals that are adapted to travel vast distances every day, living in a tight cage is torture,’ an investigator said.

Dogs bark and howl as the investigators arrive to liberate them from the rusty cages. Open Cages said the investigation of the farm will now continue, with the hope that it will soon be closed down for good.

Dogs bark and howl as the investigators arrive to liberate them from the rusty cages. Open Cages said the investigation of the farm will now continue, with the hope that it will soon be closed down for good.

‘For animals that are adapted to travel vast distances every day, living in a tight cage is torture,’ he said. 

It is not yet clear why dogs are being kept at the farm – or whether any have been slaughtered for their fur.

The investigation of the farm will now continue, with the hope that it will soon be closed down for good.

But appalling conditions like this are not unusual in the fur industry which slaughters millions of animals every year. 

Fur farms have been banned in the UK since 2000, but the UK imported £75 million worth of fur from foreign farms in 2017.

According to Open Cages, two thirds of Britons support banning the import of fur, but as a member of the European Union’s single market, the UK cannot ban the import of European fur.

Dogs stand up in their cages as they see people arriving at the farm. Fur farms have been banned in the UK since 2000, but the UK imported £75 million worth of fur from foreign farms in 2017.

Dogs stand up in their cages as they see people arriving at the farm. Fur farms have been banned in the UK since 2000, but the UK imported £75 million worth of fur from foreign farms in 2017.

The filthy rows of tiny cages where animals were kept before being slaughtered for their fur, according to the investigators

The filthy rows of tiny cages where animals were kept before being slaughtered for their fur, according to the investigators

According to Open Cages, two thirds of Britons support banning the import of fur, but as a member of the European Union's single market, the UK cannot ban the import of European fur (pictured: investigators who worked with Open Cages to save the animals)

According to Open Cages, two thirds of Britons support banning the import of fur, but as a member of the European Union’s single market, the UK cannot ban the import of European fur (pictured: investigators who worked with Open Cages to save the animals)

Of the animals that were still alive, six dogs and four foxes were immediately placed into veterinary care (pictured: a vet pinches a foxes snout during an examination)

Of the animals that were still alive, six dogs and four foxes were immediately placed into veterinary care (pictured: a vet pinches a foxes snout during an examination)

Open Cages believe that the UK should use Brexit as an opportunity to free itself from being bound to import fur, as the European Union's free trade laws compel Britain to do so (pictured: the farm in Chojnow, in the south west of Poland)

Open Cages believe that the UK should use Brexit as an opportunity to free itself from being bound to import fur, as the European Union’s free trade laws compel Britain to do so (pictured: the farm in Chojnow, in the south west of Poland)

Brexit opens up the opportunity for the British government to outlaw the import of fur and Open Cages are desperately urging the government to make that change.  

Connor Jackson, CEO of Open Cages, said: ‘Whilst it is outrageous to see beloved dogs kept in cages on fur farms, this is a reality for terrified foxes and minks daily – until they are violently killed and skinned for their fur.

‘We call on Secretary of State for Environment Theresa Villiers to commit to tackling this issue as the Labour Party has done: use Brexit as an opportunity to ban the sale of fur in the UK, before yet more animals lose their lives to this outdated industry.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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