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Rules banning shots and doubles to be scrapped after government calls end to Sydney’s lockout laws 

Rules banning shots, doubles and pre-mixed drinks to be scrapped after government signals an end to hated lockout laws

  • End of Sydney’s lockout laws to be joined by changes to drinking restrictions
  • Revellers will be able to drink double shots and pre-mixed drinks after midnight 
  • Report could recommend allowing punters to use glass containers at all times
  • NSW government will also likely advise extending relaxed laws to Oxford Street  

The lifting of Sydney’s hated lockout laws will be accompanied by an end to restrictions stopping bars from selling shots after midnight.

New South Wales premier Gladys Berejiklian announced the decision to abolish the 1.30am lockout laws in all parts of the CBD but Kings Cross earlier this month.

As well as calling for an end to the controversial legislation, an upcoming government report will also put forward detailed recommendations for the future of the city’s night-time economy.

 

The lifting of Sydney’s hated lockout laws will be accompanied by an end to restrictions stopping bars from selling shots after midnight (stock image)

Revellers will be able to drink double shots and pre-mixed drinks after 12am, as well as use glass containers through the night if the inquiry’s proposals are implemented.

A source close to the committee delivering the report told the Sydney Morning Herald the government was generally unanimous about lifting restrictions on which drinks can be bought when in the night.

The inquiry will also likely recommend extending the removal of lockout law restrictions – which requires last-call drinks to be called at 3am – to Oxford Street in Sydney’s bustling inner-city.

Kings Cross has been a notable exclusion from the relaxed lockout laws, where assaults have dropped by 53 per cent since the introduction of the law.

Ms Berejiklian said it was time to address the concerns and long standing criticism of the lockout laws.  

‘While we will await the committee’s report, I agree it’s time to enhance Sydney’s night-life,’ Ms Berejiklian said.

New South Wales premier Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) announced the decision to abolish the 1.30am lockout laws in all parts of the CBD but Kings Cross earlier this month

New South Wales premier Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) announced the decision to abolish the 1.30am lockout laws in all parts of the CBD but Kings Cross earlier this month

The most vocal group against the lockout laws, the Keep Sydney Open Party (2016 protest pictured), posted an official statement praising the move to scrap the controversial legislation

The most vocal group against the lockout laws, the Keep Sydney Open Party (2016 protest pictured), posted an official statement praising the move to scrap the controversial legislation

The lockout laws are in operation in central Sydney (pictured in red) and include 1.30am lockouts and 3am last drinks at hotels, registered clubs, nightclubs and licensed karaoke bars

The lockout laws are in operation in central Sydney (pictured in red) and include 1.30am lockouts and 3am last drinks at hotels, registered clubs, nightclubs and licensed karaoke bars

‘Sydney is Australia’s only global city and we need our night-life to reflect that.’ 

The most vocal group against the lockout laws, the Keep Sydney Open Party, posted an official statement praising the move.

‘This is a huge moment,’ the statement read.

‘Years of campaigning has led us to this point. We should all be very proud of our dedication, hard work and persistence.’

But the changes are likely to draw the ire of the city’s St Vincent’s Hospital, which supported the introduction of the 2014 restrictions and is located in the heart of the lockout zone.

Sydney’s current lockout laws 

Lock outs and last drinks: 1.30am lockouts and 3am last drinks at hotels, registered clubs, nightclubs and licenced karaoke bars

Temporary bans: of 48 hours for troublemakers 

Takeaway alcohol sales: stop at 10pm for bottle shops, hotels and clubs. This law is NSW-wide 

Liquor licences: two year freeze on approvals for new and existing licences.

Licensee fines: of up to $11,000 and/or imprisonment of up to 12 months for failure to comply with the new laws.

Revoking of Competency cards and disqualifications: (up to 12 months) for bar staff breaching responsible service of alcohol requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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