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Shark-spotting drone service expanding to search for crocodiles in Queensland waters

Shark-spotting drone service expands to search for dangerous crocodiles in popular swimming spots to protect vulnerable tourists

  • Artificial Intelligence program has been developed to help spot crocodiles 
  • The project is run by Aussie company which developed shark spotting drones
  • Program studied more than 7,000 images of crocodiles to learn their behaviour 

A shark-spotting service is working to expand its capabilities to find crocodiles in popular tourist areas.

The project, which was initiated by the Queensland government, has seen Australian company Ripper Group partner with Amazon and other firms to develop the drone’s capabilities.

‘It gives them a second set of eyes over the top of the human element to try and make it safer for crocodiles and the humans,’ Ben Trollope, the chief executive of Westpac Little Ripper drones, said.

The Artificial Intelligence program had to study more than 7,000 images of crocodiles to learn their behaviour

He said Amazon had been vital in opening up a whole capability to allow the company to get somewhere quicker.

The Artificial Intelligence program had to study more than 7,000 images of crocodiles to learn their behaviour.

Developers at the University of Technology in Sydney created an algorithm which can identify 16 different types of marine life.

They say it has a 93 per cent accuracy rate.

Capabilities includes reduced delays in transmitting footage. 

It can also separate crocodiles from mangroves in northern Queensland’s dense bush.

Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver have worked closely with the University of Technology Sydney to develop an Artificial Intelligence based system that is able to detect a variety of marine threats ¿with high accuracy, in real-time. Sharkspotter can detects sharks

Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver have worked closely with the University of Technology Sydney to develop an Artificial Intelligence based system that is able to detect a variety of marine threats ​with high accuracy, in real-time. Sharkspotter can detects sharks

Developers at the University of Technology in Sydney created an algorithm which can identify 16 different types of marine life. They say it has a 93 per cent accuracy rate

Developers at the University of Technology in Sydney created an algorithm which can identify 16 different types of marine life. They say it has a 93 per cent accuracy rate

FATAL CROCODILE ATTACKS IN NORTH QUEENSLAND: 

2011: Father David Fordson was snorkeling in Bushy Island, Shelbourne Bay when he was attacked

2016: Cindy Waldron, 46, was waist deep in water at Thornton Beach when she was killed 

2017: Spearfisherman Warren Hughes, 35, died after an attack in Palmer Point, north of Innisfail

2017: Anne Cameron, 79, disappeared from aged care facility Craiglie Creek, Port Douglas

 

Surf Lifesaving Queensland Lifesaving Operations Coordinator Jason Argent told The Courier Mail the Artificial Intelligence technology would help combat the crocodile issues north Queensland has death with previously.

‘Come summer we hope to have all drones in North Queensland running this AI seamlessly, allowing pilots to have better confidence in what they’re seeing in the water.’

Four people have been killed by crocodiles between 2011 and 2018.

In 2017, grandmother Anne Cameron, 79, disappeared from aged care facility Ozcare near Port Douglas.

Human remains were found inside a crocodile weeks later.

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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