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Small changes, big savings: Australians share the ways they’re saving money on their weekly budget

The small changes Aussies are making to save money as the cost of living soars – from quitting smoking to meal prepping and charging phones in cars

  • Australians are sharing the changes they’ve made to save on the cost of living 
  • One mum asked members on Facebook group to share their budget hacks 
  • She said she now charges her phone in the car and turns electrics off at the wall
  • Others suggested using half the amount of toothpaste, shampoo, and soap
  • A thrifty user said to buy in-season fresh produce and to do meal plans and preps
  • More tips included growing herbs and veggies and switching to LED light bulbs

Australians are sharing their money saving hacks online from quitting smoking, to unplugging electrical appliances and even using half the amount of toothpaste, shampoo and soap. 

Hundreds of Aussies responded to a post to popular Facebook group Simple Savers in which one mum asked to know the ‘little changes’ people had made to save money as the cost of living skyrockets. 

‘I’m plugging my phone in to the car charger when doing the school run, I’ve reconfigured power boards so I can turn appliances off at the wall and not have them ‘always on’,’ she wrote. 

Hundreds of Australians online are sharing the small life changes they made to save them big money from charging their phone in the car, growing vegetables and meal prepping

Many took to the comments to share their own budget friendly hacks with many agreeing unplugging appliances and electronics when not in use can save on power bills

Many took to the comments to share their own budget friendly hacks with many agreeing unplugging appliances and electronics when not in use can save on power bills

‘I’ve started collecting the little bits of soap that are too small to use anymore in a jar to make liquid soap… this won’t save me a fortune, but it all adds up.’ 

Many took to the comments to share their own budget friendly hacks with many agreeing unplugging appliances and electronics when not in use can save on power bills.  

‘Love the idea about not having appliances on ‘standby’. I have started checking some of our appliances. The microwave, dishwasher, washing machine etc. It all adds up – better for the environment too!’ one member wrote. 

Aussies share how they save money as the coast of living rises

‘I bought automatic foaming dispensers that use a tiny amount of soap & rest is water. I hardly buy hand soap now’

‘I do my own cleaning products…vinegar/bicarbonate/ citric acid and lemon. Nice for the planet and my purse.’

‘I’ve stopped buying soft drink, juice and bottled water. I don’t buy groceries based on what meals I want to cook that week anymore, I buy food that’s marked down and half price and plan a menu based on what I’ve bought.’

‘Use Amazon to buy household items. Most of the time it’s cheaper than the supermarkets.’

 ‘I put everything into reusable pump containers, dishwashing liquid, hand wash, shampoo, conditioner, body wash. They all last a lot longer as you don’t accidently pour a lot more then needed, the kids all know how many pumps to wash their hair & wash their hands etc.’

‘We changed to LED light bulbs and immediately saw the savings.’ 

‘For me, taking a shopping list to the supermarket, and sticking to it, no extras. I only go into the supermarket aisles I need to.’

‘Stopped buying books, magazines, cook books and only borrow from library as well as using apps to download magazines and books to read through the library.’ 

‘Go the the Op Shop. You’d be surprised what you can buy for very little money.’

‘When you just switch off at the power point your still paying electric bill cause it’s plugged in it needs to be unplugged,’ another responded. 

‘They call them vampire appliances as they suck the power. Here I was thinking I was doing it correctly by just turning the power switch off,’ said a third. 

One savvy saver said they have started using half the recommended amount of toiletries and cleaning products. 

‘Mostly the recommended amount is way too much. It’s also fun peeling apart layers of toilet paper, I don’t do it to save money although you need far less,’ they said. 

Another said they had given up smoking while a mum said they started using half the recommended amount of toiletries and cleaning product

'Bought a second hand electric bike for $1300 just before fuel prices skyrocketed, as I live about 5km out of town and it's saved me heaps in fuel,' one woman said

One member said they saved a fortune after quitting smoking in March while another started biking to work to reduce the cost of fuel

Budget veggie swaps to save at the shop

❌Instead of broccoli for $12 a kilo

✅Buy cauliflower at $4-$5 each

❌Instead of  fresh tomatoes for $10-$14 a kilo

✅Buy canned tomatoes for $1-$2 a tin

❌Instead of lettuce for $6-$12 a head

✅Buy kale for $4-$5 a bunch or $1-$2 frozen

❌Instead of red capsicum for $10-$12 a kilo

✅Buy tinned beetroot for $3 a kilo 

Another said they had given up smoking while one woman shared how bought an electric bike to save on fuel. 

‘Bought a second hand electric bike for $1300 just before fuel prices skyrocketed, as I live about 5km out of town and it’s saved me heaps in fuel. I ride it all kinds weather and have hardly needed to fuel up at all since then,’ she said. 

‘Meal plan, buy in season fruit and veg (or frozen), make things from scratch instead of convenience options, cancel any subscription services, walk more (drive less), utilise the library for books and toys, use blankets and warm clothes instead of heaters,’ another recommended. 

A thrifty man said he saved heaps by switching to LED light bulbs and another advised people to quit drinking alcohol. 

Other tips included layering blankets rather than using an electrical one, planting herbs and vegetables, meal prepping and planning ahead, using appliances at night outside of peak times and buying items on special at the supermarket in bulk. 

‘I now buy budget dish liquid and refill my bottle. We have cancelled unnecessary insurance. I recycle as it doesn’t cost you at all as opposed to rubbish bags. And I’ve pulled out the sewing machine and repairing things instead of replacing,’ a mum said.

‘I toss all my coins into a jar and once I have filled the jar I bank them. For anyone who has debts, the coins in the jar can be taken out once a month and pay off a bill,’ another wrote. 

‘I cook larger batches of food and freeze in meal lots so I’m only reheating at night instead of cooking, roll on deodorant instead of spray on, a third shared. 

‘Have cosy blankets in the lounge if it gets a bit cooler during the evening (Qld), so never need to use a heater, no lights on in the evening – just the light from the TV, and I preserve food when I can buy it cheap,’ they continued.

In-season fruits and vegetables for winter: Your go-to guide

Fruit

Apple

Grapefruit

Kiwifruit 

Lemon

Limes

Mandarin

Oranges 

Papaya

Pears

Pineapple 

Pawpaw

Pomegranate 

Quince

Rhubarb 

 

Vegetables 

Artichoke 

Asian Greens

Avocado

Beetroot

Broccoli

Brussels sprouts

Cabbage

Carrots

Cauliflower

 Celeriac

Celery

Fennel

Garlic

Ginger

Kale

Leeks

Onions

Parsnip 

Peas

Potato

Pumpkin

Silverbeet

Spinach

Swede

Sweet potato

Turnip

Witlof 

Source: FrugalAndThriving.com.au

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