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South Koreans eat boiled dog meat during protest by animal rights activists including Kim Basinger 

South Korean dog farmers ate boiled dog meat as they staged a counter-rally during an animal rights protest.

The fiery demonstration, on the country’s ‘dog meat day’, took place outside the National Assembly, the nation’s legislative body. 

Dog farmers wearing red bandannas emblazoned with ‘Fight. Unity’ in Korean appeared to taunt activists by eating dog meat outside the building.

Meanwhile actress Kim Basinger was among the animal cruelty campaigners and held models of dead dogs. 

Actress Kim Basinger joined protests in South Korea to call for an end to the dog trade in the country

Dog farmers wearing red bandanas emblazoned with 'Fight. Unity' in Korean appeared to taunt dog activists by eating dog meat outside the Assembly

Dog farmers wearing red bandanas emblazoned with ‘Fight. Unity’ in Korean appeared to taunt dog activists by eating dog meat outside the Assembly

Protesters held models of scorched dogs in front of the National Assembly in the South Korean capital

Protesters held models of scorched dogs in front of the National Assembly in the South Korean capital

Animal rights activists held signs reading 'How many millions have to die before dog meat ends?'

Animal rights activists held signs reading ‘How many millions have to die before dog meat ends?’

Members of the ‘Last Chance for Animals’ group held signs reading ‘How many millions have to die before dog meat ends?’.

Basinger, who protested last year outside South Korea’s consulate in Los Angeles, called on the Assembly to ‘end this cruelty on this planet’.

Galvanised by a court ruling last year that made it illegal to kill dogs for meat, animal rights activist are putting more pressure on South Korea’s lawmakers for an outright ban on dog and cat consumption.

While the killing of dogs for meat is illegal, it is not illegal to consume dog meat and this legal grey area was readily exploited by the 20 or so dog farmers.

The L.A. Confidential star, left, watches a pet dog during a rally to oppose eating dog meat

The L.A. Confidential star, left, watches a pet dog during a rally to oppose eating dog meat

Galvanised by a court ruling last year that made it illegal to kill dogs for meat, animal rights activist are putting more pressure on South Korea's lawmakers for an outright ban on dog and cat consumption

Galvanised by a court ruling last year that made it illegal to kill dogs for meat, animal rights activist are putting more pressure on South Korea’s lawmakers for an outright ban on dog and cat consumption

Members of the Last Chance for Animals hold models of slaughtered dogs during a rally to oppose eating dog meat in front of the National Assembl

Members of the Last Chance for Animals hold models of slaughtered dogs during a rally to oppose eating dog meat in front of the National Assembl

Members of Korean Dog Meat Association eat dog meat during a rally to support eating dog meat

Members of Korean Dog Meat Association eat dog meat during a rally to support eating dog meat

Dog farmers wearing red bandanas emblazoned with 'Fight. Unity' in Korean appeared to taunt dog activists by eating dog meat outside the Assembly

Dog farmers wearing red bandanas emblazoned with ‘Fight. Unity’ in Korean appeared to taunt dog activists by eating dog meat outside the Assembly

American actress Kim Basinger, right, and members of the Last Chance for Animals with models of slaughtered dogs

American actress Kim Basinger, right, and members of the Last Chance for Animals with models of slaughtered dogs

Around one million dogs are eaten annually, but consumption has declined from approximately two million.   

There are still an estimated 17,000 dog farms operating in South Korea and despite the ban, heavy lobbying is underway to license dog slaughter houses. 

Boiled dog meat has long been considered a part of South Korean cuisine but in recent years, it has become increasingly taboo among younger generations. 

Dog meat is typically served in ‘bosintang’, or dog meat soup, which some South Koreans believe gives them strength to overcome the heat. 

Scorcher: The rally was held on one of the hottest days in the South Korean calendar

Scorcher: The rally was held on one of the hottest days in the South Korean calendar

Kim Basinger and Chris DeRose, president of Last Chance for Animals, hold mock dog meat during a rally against the practice of the meat

Kim Basinger and Chris DeRose, president of Last Chance for Animals, hold mock dog meat during a rally against the practice of the meat

While the killing of dogs for meat is illegal, it is not illegal to consume dog meat and this legal grey area was readily exploited by the 20 or so dog farmers

While the killing of dogs for meat is illegal, it is not illegal to consume dog meat and this legal grey area was readily exploited by the 20 or so dog farmers

There are still an estimated 17,000 dog farms operating in South Korea and in spite of the ban, heavy lobbying is underway to license dog slaughter houses

There are still an estimated 17,000 dog farms operating in South Korea and in spite of the ban, heavy lobbying is underway to license dog slaughter houses

Dog meat is served by South Korean dog farmers during a counter-rally outside the National Assembly

Dog meat is served by South Korean dog farmers during a counter-rally outside the National Assembly

Kim Basinger, left, speaks as members of the Last Chance for Animals with models of slaughtered dogs hold a rally to oppose eating dog meat

Kim Basinger, left, speaks as members of the Last Chance for Animals with models of slaughtered dogs hold a rally to oppose eating dog meat

The protest was held on Friday and according to South Korean folkore, it is the first of the three hottest days in the country.

The issue over dog consumption remains divisive in South Korea. 

According to a survey by Realmeter last year, 44.2 per cent of Koreans said they would support banning the killing of dogs for consumption, while 43.7 per cent said they were against it.

The actress and former model protested last year outside South Korea's consulate in Los Angeles

The actress and former model protested last year outside South Korea’s consulate in Los Angeles

Animal rights protesters with signs reading 'We are not food' and 'please do not eat us'

Animal rights protesters with signs reading ‘We are not food’ and ‘please do not eat us’

South Korean animal rights activists hold banners during a protest against the dog meat trade

South Korean animal rights activists hold banners during a protest against the dog meat trade

Boiled dog meat has long been considered part of the South Korean cuisine but in recent years, it has become increasingly taboo among younger generations

Boiled dog meat has long been considered part of the South Korean cuisine but in recent years, it has become increasingly taboo among younger generations

The issue over dog consumption remains heavily divided in South Korea with a near 50:50 split

The issue over dog consumption remains heavily divided in South Korea with a near 50:50 split 

South Korean animal rights activists display likenesses of dead dogs during a protest against the dog meat trade

South Korean animal rights activists display likenesses of dead dogs during a protest against the dog meat trade

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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