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Sports clubs BAN kids’ orange slices at halftime due to health concerns

Sports clubs BAN kids’ orange slices at halftime due to health concerns – but they want to replace the popular fruit with lollies

  • Plan by parents and sporting clubs to ban oranges as the halftime snack for kids
  • Fears the oranges could result in the heavy tooth decay among youngsters 
  • Plans are to replace the oranges with lollies to give children ‘sugar hit’ instead 

Some sporting clubs and parents have moved to ban orange slices as a halftime snack during junior games and instead want to replace them with lollies. 

A number of sporting clubs in South Australia are looking into banning the traditional break snack over fears the natural citric acids are bad for children’s teeth, 7 News reported. 

A host of concerns are behind the move, including fears the fruit causes stomach issues for children and the citric acids could result in tooth decay. 

Some sporting clubs and parents have moved to ban orange slices as a half time snack during junior games and instead want to replace them with lollies (stock image)

According to a study from Science Direct ‘excessive or frequent consumption of citric acid has been associated with erosion of the teeth’.

Oranges have 0.6 to 1 percent of citric acid by weight while lemons and limes contain the highest concentrations of citric acid.  

West Adelaide Soccer Club chairman Alex Alexandrou told the publication the move was put forward and supported strongly by parents. 

‘It’s something that seems to have evolved from parents talking to other parents and saying, “Look, let’s not go the oranges, let’s give the kids a sugar hit,”‘ he said. 

Dentists said the risks associated with oranges came from being dehydrated more so than just eating the fruit regularly. 

When people are dehydrated there is less saliva in the mouth working to protect and repair the surface of the tooth, causing risks with citric acids. 

The idea is to replace oranges with lollies in order to give children a ‘sugar hit’ before they go back out and continue to compete.  

Dentists said the risks associated with oranges came from people being dehydrated because the condition limits saliva's ability to protect and mend teeth (stock image)

Dentists said the risks associated with oranges came from people being dehydrated because the condition limits saliva’s ability to protect and mend teeth (stock image)

However a study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research concluded eating an orange a day reduces the risk of developing macular degeneration.

The research showed that people who ate at least one orange a day had more than a 60% reduced risk of developing late macular degeneration 15 years later. 

Lead Researcher Associate Professor Bamini Gopinath from the University of Sydney said the data showed that flavonoids, or plant pigments, in oranges appear to help prevent against the eye disease.

‘Essentially we found that people who eat at least one serve of orange every day have a reduced risk of developing macular degeneration compared with people who never eat oranges,’ she said.

‘Even eating an orange once a week seems to offer significant benefits.’

A study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research concluded eating an orange a day reduces the risk of developing macular degeneration (stock image)

A study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research concluded eating an orange a day reduces the risk of developing macular degeneration (stock image)

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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