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Stunning 103-acre private island on Loch Lomond on the market

A secluded property located on a private island in Scotland which was once the holiday home of the Countess of Arran has just hit the market for a staggering £500,000.

The uninhabited 103-acre home on Inchonnachan Island in Loch Lomond is surrounded by acres of lush green vegetation, a number of secluded bays and a shoreline which extends to 3.9km. 

Sitting between the islands of Inchtavannach to the west and Inchmoan to the south, the colonial-style timber property, which has been vacant for around 20 years, boasts a boathouse and pier and comes with detailed planning consent for the construction of five new bedroom lodges.  

The property, which is being sold by the Colquhoun family who have owned it since the 14th century, was once the holiday home of the powerboat champion and Countess of Arran, Fiona Gore, who won the prestigious Segrave Trophy in 1980.

The secluded timber property, which comes with planning consent for a house, is located on Inchonnachan Island in Loch Lomond, Scotland

The derelict house comes with its own private island in Scotland and is surrounded by acres of lush green vegetation, a number of secluded bays and a shoreline

The derelict house comes with its own private island in Scotland and is surrounded by acres of lush green vegetation, a number of secluded bays and a shoreline 

The 103-acre home on sits between the islands of Inchtavannach to the west and Inchmoan to the south and has been vacant for around 20 years

The 103-acre home on sits between the islands of Inchtavannach to the west and Inchmoan to the south and has been vacant for around 20 years

The private island, which is on the market until noon on August 12, is covered with acres of coniferous woodland, including Oak, Aspen, Alder, Scot’s Pine, Douglas Fir and Larch.

It is also surrounded by green vegetation including blaeberry, bryophytes, heath bedstraw and wood sorrel.   

The stunning Island, which welcomes an array of wildlife throughout the year including sika deers, jays, coal tits, crossbills, collared doves and, occasionally, nesting ospreys, is also famous for its colony of wallabies, which are thought to have been introduced to the area in the 1940s. 

The island, which is being marketed jointly by Savills and Knight Frank, is predominantly covered with ancient oak woodland and is only accessible via boat which is a short trip from the pier at Luss.

While the existing derelict bungalow, boathouse and pier were constructed in the 1920s, reportedly by the retired tea merchant Admiral Sullivan who designed the property in the style of an Indian tea plantation bungalow, in 2015 estate agents obtained planning consent to replace the original home.

The planning permission, which was obtained from the Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park Authority,  will see the existing property replaced with a new four-bedroom lodge and a one-bedroom warden’s house. 

Despite its relative seclusion, there is plenty to do on the Island, including wake-boarding, sailing, mountain-biking, kayaking, angling and hill walking.

Cameron Ewer from Savills said: ‘This is an extraordinary opportunity to acquire a beautiful and completely private, yet accessible, retreat and create a wonderful new residence there. 

Built during the 1920s, reportedly by an Admiral Sullivan who was a retired tea merchant, the property boasts a boathouse, pier and five bedroom lodges

Built during the 1920s, reportedly by an Admiral Sullivan who was a retired tea merchant, the property boasts a boathouse, pier and five bedroom lodges

The private island  is surrounded with acres of coniferous woodland, including Oak, Aspen, Alder, Scot's Pine, Douglas Fir and Larch

The private island  is surrounded with acres of coniferous woodland, including Oak, Aspen, Alder, Scot’s Pine, Douglas Fir and Larch

Green vegetation including blaeberry, bryophytes, heath bedstraw and wood sorrel, also surround the private island in Scotland

Green vegetation including blaeberry, bryophytes, heath bedstraw and wood sorrel, also surround the private island in Scotland

The stunning Island is famous for its colony of wallabies and welcomes an array of wildlife throughout the year including sika deers, jays, coal tits, crossbills, collared doves and, occasionally, nesting ospreys

The stunning Island is famous for its colony of wallabies and welcomes an array of wildlife throughout the year including sika deers, jays, coal tits, crossbills, collared doves and, occasionally, nesting ospreys

In 2015, the estate agent received permission to replace the existing property with a new four-bedroom lodge and one-bedroom warden's house. Pictured: Plans for the new replacement property

In 2015, the estate agent received permission to replace the existing property with a new four-bedroom lodge and one-bedroom warden’s house. Pictured: Plans for the new replacement property

‘For those seeking peace and seclusion, yet wanting all that this part of Scotland has to offer in the way of nature and water-based sport and activities, this is surely the ultimate prize.’ 

The derelict timber property, which has been vacant for approximately 20 years, was once the summer retreat for the Countess of Arran who became the unlikely powerboat champion at the 1980 Segrave Trophy. 

Born on July 20, 1918 to Geraldine Bryde Tennant and Iain Colquhoun, the seventh Baronet of Luss, Lady Arran, became a record holder by reaching a top speed of 102mph in her powerboat Skean-Dhu on Lake Windemere in Cumbria’s Lake District.

The Countess, who married Sir Arthur Kattendyke Strange David Archibald Gore in 1937, was said to have been drawn to the small house on the Isle of Inchconnachan on Loch Lomond and often boated there.    

The secluded home in Loch Lomond was once the summer retreat for the Countess of Arran, Fiona Gore (pictured in her speedboat in 1982), who became the unlikely champion powerboater at the 1980 Segrave Trophy

The secluded home in Loch Lomond was once the summer retreat for the Countess of Arran, Fiona Gore (pictured in her speedboat in 1982), who became the unlikely champion powerboater at the 1980 Segrave Trophy

The island, which is being marketed jointly by Savills and Knight Frank, allows for a range of activities including wake-boarding, sailing, mountain-biking, kayaking, angling and hill walking

The island, which is being marketed jointly by Savills and Knight Frank, allows for a range of activities including wake-boarding, sailing, mountain-biking, kayaking, angling and hill walking

The derelict bungalow, boathouse and pier were constructed in the 1920, is only accessible via boat which is a short trip from the pier at Luss

The derelict bungalow, boathouse and pier were constructed in the 1920, is only accessible via boat which is a short trip from the pier at Luss

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