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Stunning converted 19th-Century chapel goes on sale for £675,000

A stunning converted chapel in the village where the BBC adaptation of All Creatures Great and Small was filmed has gone on the market for £675,000.

Askrigg Chapel, in North Yorkshire, has been beautifully converted to make the most of its 19th century features, including its vaulted ceiling and arched stained glass windows.

The stunning property, built in 1878, is nestled in the village of Askrigg in the Yorkshire Dales, which doubled as the fictional town of Darrowby in the BBC drama All Creatures Great and Small.

Executives for the 1970s series picked Askrigg as the home of country vet James Herriot because they were hunting for an ‘unspoiled’ location in which to make the adaptation of James Alfred Wight’s books. The village, with its idyllic cobbled streets, fitted the bill.

The location did not appear in the Channel 5 adaptation which aired in September, with those involved disregarding both Askrigg and Thirsk – where Wight lived and worked – as potential locations due to the busy roads surrounding them. 

The latest series, set in the 1930s, was instead filmed in Grassington, North Yorkshire.

Askrigg Chapel, in North Yorkshire, has been beautifully converted to make the most of its 19th century features, including its vaulted ceiling and arched stained glass windows

Askrigg Chapel was built in 1878, and was a Wesleyan Methodist church until it was deconsecrated in 1978. Pictured: The open place top floor

Askrigg Chapel was built in 1878, and was a Wesleyan Methodist church until it was deconsecrated in 1978. Pictured: The open place top floor

In the BBC adaptation, Cringley House in Askrigg, near Leyburn, had appeared as the Skeldale House veterinary surgery during filming in the 1970s and 1980s. The Grade-II listed property was officially renamed Skeldale House in 2013. 

The King’s Arms in the village had also posed as the fictional Drovers pub in the series. Askrigg Chapel was built in 1878, and was a Wesleyan Methodist church until it was deconsecrated in 1978. 

It had been run as a B&B when Anita Watson and her partner Paul Barker bought it seven years ago, but its previous conversion had hidden the property’s vaulted ceilings. 

The house has 3,305 sq ft over three floors, which can be separated into two apartments. 

On the ground floor is an entrance hall, kitchen/dining room, utility room, reception room, two bedrooms, a bathroom and a study. 

The property (pictured) had been run as a B&B when Anita Watson and her partner Paul Barker bought it seven years ago, but its previous conversion had hidden the property's vaulted ceilings

The property (pictured) had been run as a B&B when Anita Watson and her partner Paul Barker bought it seven years ago, but its previous conversion had hidden the property’s vaulted ceilings

Askrigg Chapel features a wrought iron staircase (pictured) designed by Yorkshire sculptor Craig Dyson, who also curated a bespoke bar inside the home

Askrigg Chapel features a wrought iron staircase (pictured) designed by Yorkshire sculptor Craig Dyson, who also curated a bespoke bar inside the home

Pictured: The top floor of the property, which features stunning stained glass windows and the original vaulted ceilings

Pictured: The top floor of the property, which features stunning stained glass windows and the original vaulted ceilings

The stunning property, built in 1878, is nestled in the village of Askrigg in the Yorkshire Dales, which doubled as the fictional town of Darrowby in the BBC drama All Creatures Great and Small. Pictured: Christopher Timothy and Robert Hardy in the show

The stunning property, built in 1878, is nestled in the village of Askrigg in the Yorkshire Dales, which doubled as the fictional town of Darrowby in the BBC drama All Creatures Great and Small. Pictured: Christopher Timothy and Robert Hardy in the show

The first floor has a dining hall, the master bedroom with a dressing room, a large bathroom with a Hammam Turkish style steam room, and a second bedroom with an ensuite.

The top floor is open plan with a kitchen, bar and dining area and a galleried landing overlooking the dining hall.

Askrigg Chapel features a wrought iron staircase designed by Yorkshire sculptor Craig Dyson, who also curated the bespoke bar. On the second floor, there is a contemporary fireplace encased in glass.

Outside, the property has off-road parking and a low-maintenance landscaped walled garden with a pond. 

The village has three pubs, a tea room, grocer, delicatessen, shop and primary school, is surrounded by the dramatic scenery of the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

It is a popular base for walkers who want to explore the countryside and someone could live in the top two floors and rent out the lower floor as a holiday let.

Executives for the 1970s series picked Askrigg as the home of country vet James Herriot because they were hunting for an 'unspoiled' location in which to make the adaptation of James Alfred Wight's books. The village, with its idyllic cobbled streets, fitted the bill. Pictured: Robert Hardy, Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison in the show

Executives for the 1970s series picked Askrigg as the home of country vet James Herriot because they were hunting for an ‘unspoiled’ location in which to make the adaptation of James Alfred Wight’s books. The village, with its idyllic cobbled streets, fitted the bill. Pictured: Robert Hardy, Christopher Timothy and Peter Davison in the show

James Wort, from estate agents Strutt & Parker, said: 'I think the location is a real selling point - the village is where they filmed All Creatures Great and Small so it has got a huge pull.' Pictured: The wrought iron staircase

James Wort, from estate agents Strutt & Parker, said: ‘I think the location is a real selling point – the village is where they filmed All Creatures Great and Small so it has got a huge pull.’ Pictured: The wrought iron staircase

The first floor has a dining hall, the master bedroom with a dressing room, a large bathroom with a Hammam Turkish style steam room (pictured), and a second bedroom with an ensuite

The first floor has a dining hall, the master bedroom with a dressing room, a large bathroom with a Hammam Turkish style steam room (pictured), and a second bedroom with an ensuite

On the ground floor is an entrance hall, kitchen/dining room, utility room, reception room, two bedrooms, a bathroom and a study. Pictured: The downstairs

On the ground floor is an entrance hall, kitchen/dining room, utility room, reception room, two bedrooms, a bathroom and a study. Pictured: The downstairs

 Ms Watson, 57, said: ‘The chapel was de-consecrated in 1978 and used for various different purposes after that, including a music workshop.

‘I think it was well-used, lots of people in the village say “I was married in your church”, or “I was christened there”.

‘It had been converted into a B&B when we bought it but it was all on one level. It wasn’t until we looked in the loft we realised it had this vast amount of space and we could convert it into a proper three-storey house.

‘My partner had always wanted to live in the Dales and I had always wanted to convert a church. It’s not listed, which is unusual, and it doesn’t have a graveyard, which is unusual too, so all those things made it perfect for us.

‘There was a lot of challenges, mainly creating a contemporary space in a traditional building, but we succeeded and the conversion took seven months flat out.’

Pictured: Stunning exposed brick walls inside one of the property's bathrooms, which features a freestanding bathtub

Pictured: Stunning exposed brick walls inside one of the property’s bathrooms, which features a freestanding bathtub

Pictured: The open plan top floor, which features a kitchen and dining room, alongside stunning original stained glass windows

Pictured: The open plan top floor, which features a kitchen and dining room, alongside stunning original stained glass windows

Downstairs, the property has an impressive entrance hall (pictured) alongside two bedrooms, a reception room and a study

Downstairs, the property has an impressive entrance hall (pictured) alongside two bedrooms, a reception room and a study

The village has three pubs, a tea room, grocer, delicatessen, shop and primary school, is surrounded by the dramatic scenery of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Pictured: The kitchen

The village has three pubs, a tea room, grocer, delicatessen, shop and primary school, is surrounded by the dramatic scenery of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Pictured: The kitchen

The couple had planned on it being their ‘forever home’, but they are now downsizing and hoping to stay in the village.’

She added: ‘I am sad to leave, this was my forever home and so much time and effort went into it, but it will continue to be a very special place.

‘We are planning to stay in the village, we love it here – the people are so friendly and the community is wonderful.’

James Wort, from estate agents Strutt & Parker, said: ‘I think the location is a real selling point – the village is where they filmed All Creatures Great and Small so it has got a huge pull.

‘It’s a beautiful part of the country, with the rolling countryside, and the character of the property is quite unique – there aren’t many of these sort of chapels around.

‘Most people who have looked at it, have looked at using the downstairs floor as a walkers’ cottage. There’s lots of outdoor activities nearby so renting it out to generate income would work.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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