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Sunshine Coast fence post saves kangaroos from extinction after bushfire crisis 

How a roadside post is saving kangaroos from extinction after one BILLION animals were killed during Australia’s bushfire crisis

  • Christine Pitcher praised the introduction of acoustic roadside in her local area 
  • The fences make a noise when activated by car headlights, alerting animals
  • Kangaroos and other native animals’ lives are saved from becoming roadkill
  • The CSIRO estimates that four million mammals are killed on roads each year 
  • The bushfires have killed one billion animals, pushing wildlife to extinction 

A simple fence post is saving kangaroos and other Australian wildlife from extinction after one billion animals were killed during the bushfire crisis.  

Marketing Consultant Christine Pitcher praised the introduction of acoustic roadside posts by the Sunshine Coast Council in Queensland on Tuesday. 

Ms Pitcher shared a picture of an unassuming green post with an electronic unit attached to it on Facebook.

‘This insignificant looking post is one of many which have been placed along the road where I live,’ she captioned the post.      

‘We’d had many kangaroos and other wildlife killed after being hit by cars. These posts are activated by car headlights shining on them and emit a loud buzzing sound thereby deterring wildlife from crossing the road.’ 

A simple fence post (pictured) is saving kangaroos and other Australian wildlife from extinction after one billion animals were killed during the bushfire crisis

Marketing Consultant Christine Pitcher praised the introduction of acoustic roadside posts that alert kangaroos when it is unsafe to cross the road on Tuesday

Marketing Consultant Christine Pitcher praised the introduction of acoustic roadside posts that alert kangaroos when it is unsafe to cross the road on Tuesday

Ms Pitcher said she and her neighbours complained to Sunshine Coast Council about roadkill and the council ‘listened and acted’ in response.

‘Very impressed so far with no dead wildlife since they (the acoustic posts) went in two months ago. Thank you Sunshine Coast Council,’ she said. 

Each year, four million mammals are killed on Australian roads, according to the CSIRO.   

Since most native mammals are marsupials, female casualties often have their surviving young in their pouches, which sees 560,000 joeys orphaned each year. 

The bushfire crisis has put increased pressure on Australian wildlife as an estimated one billion animals have perished in the blazes. 

On the Sunshine Coast, there have been several bushfires over the current season but the exact impact on local wildlife is not known.

Although the acoustic posts were only introduced to Ms Pitcher’s neighbourhood recently, they groundbreaking technology was first trialed by her council in 2018.  

Each year, four million mammals are killed on Australian roads, according to the CSIRO. Kangaroo deaths often result in orphaned joeys

Each year, four million mammals are killed on Australian roads, according to the CSIRO. Kangaroo deaths often result in orphaned joeys 

Dubbed a ‘virtual fence’, the electronic signs are designed to change both kangaroo and driver behaviour.

‘Most collisions occur because of the surprise element for both the driver and the kangaroo,’ a council statement at the time read. 

‘With this equipment, kangaroos are alerted to oncoming cars or motorbikes before crossing and correspondingly the cars and motorbikes are warned to slow down.’ 

Although the acoustic posts were only introduced to Ms Pitcher's neighbourhood recently, they groundbreaking technology was first trialed by her council in 2018

Although the acoustic posts were only introduced to Ms Pitcher’s neighbourhood recently, they groundbreaking technology was first trialed by her council in 2018

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk