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Surgeon SLAMS writer for telling women to stop ‘sewing their a** to their face’


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American poet Janne Robinson wrote a now viral post on Facebook urging women to stop using plastic surgery and to leave what the ‘creator’ made alone. 

Her controversial comments sparked mass fury online with cosmetic doctor Naomi McCullum from The Manse Clinic in Sydney calling them ‘anti-feminist’ in nature.  

‘This plastic negative is showing her extreme ignorance about those who have cosmetic treatments when she says, “I’m sorry you thought you’d be more worthy” and “I’m sorry we live in a world where you believe the most important thing you can be is pretty”,’ Dr Naomi told FEMAIL.

 

But a client of Dr Naomi’s, Zilla Stacey, (pictured) said the original post could be seen as a form of hate and bullying

‘Wrong wrong wrong! These plastic negatives are always assuming they know our reasons for doing cosmetic treatments. They should stop putting words in our mouths, as they just do not understand the mind of a beauty achiever. It’s so embarrassing for them, their lack of understanding and their lack of true empathy.

‘We love having treatments, it makes us happy,’ she continued.

‘Plastic negatives should focus on controlling their own bodies and we (the plastic positives) will of course keep enjoying what we do with ours! I’d consider it anti-feminist to criticise women for the choices they make about what to do with their own bodies.

‘Some of these plastic negatives seem so triggered by the democratisation of beauty, it makes me wonder why… Just be plastic neutral, live and let live, people.’

One person who took offence at the rise of surgery users was American poet Janne Robinson (pictured), who unleashed a vicious tirade on Facebook on the topic

One person who took offence at the rise of surgery users was American poet Janne Robinson (pictured), who unleashed a vicious tirade on Facebook on the topic

Janne has since contacted Daily Mail Australia to explain her rant, saying that she had seen a photograph of a woman who ‘had so much plastic surgery she didn’t look like a person anymore.’  

‘It saddened and enraged me,’ she said.

‘I felt called to speak to it because I am seeing more and more body modification in the world, and it makes me wonder how many women are reflecting and doing the emotional work on why they want to change their bodies.

‘The conversation I wanted to have, is – are we doing the work to heal our emotional wounds that may have come from being bullied in middle school about that crook in our nose?

'If she really loved and cared about women she would support them in whatever decisions they made to make them feel more body confident,' Zilla (right) told FEMAIL

‘If she really loved and cared about women she would support them in whatever decisions they made to make them feel more body confident,’ Zilla (right) told FEMAIL

'Whilst people don't always need cosmetic or plastic surgery, if it will give them the self confidence to be the best person they can possibly be then that's their prerogative,' she said

‘Whilst people don’t always need cosmetic or plastic surgery, if it will give them the self confidence to be the best person they can possibly be then that’s their prerogative,’ she said

‘Are we sitting down and sitting with our pain from being made fun of and ostracized by our classmates and connecting it to a belief that we may have created which has now manifested as a insecurity about our nose, or are we just buying a new one?’.

But a client of Dr Naomi’s, Zilla Stacey, said the original post could be seen as a form of hate and bullying.

‘If she really loved and cared about women she would support them in whatever decisions they made to make them feel more body confident,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘Whilst people don’t always need cosmetic or plastic surgery, if it will give them the self confidence to be the best person they can possibly be then that’s their prerogative.’  

'Stop taking flesh from your a** and putting it in your face. Stop getting silicone sewn to your chest. I am sick of women looking the same,' she wrote

‘Stop taking flesh from your a** and putting it in your face. Stop getting silicone sewn to your chest. I am sick of women looking the same,’ she wrote

The original post began by asking women to ‘please stop injecting s*** into your lips.’

‘Stop taking flesh from your a** and putting it in your face. Stop getting silicone sewn to your chest. I am sick of women looking the same.

‘I am sick of artificially inseminated manufactured blondes with t*** that aren’t real, lips that aren’t real and their eyebrows looking like they constantly drink 10 espressos a day.

‘Let your body goddamn be.’

Janne, who has 55,000 followers on Facebook, regularly posts thoughtful opinion pieces on women's interest topics - but this is the first of its kind to go viral

Janne, who has 55,000 followers on Facebook, regularly posts thoughtful opinion pieces on women’s interest topics – but this is the first of its kind to go viral

Janne, who has 55,000 followers on Facebook, regularly posts thoughtful opinion pieces on women’s interest topics – but this is the first of its kind to go viral. 

‘To the women who hopefully haven’t altered themselves – who worry their breasts aren’t a handful, or they are too boyish, or that their lips are too thin, or that they have wrinkles forming from laughing – you were sewn from the hands of the heavens, by she that is the creator, by all that is and all that should ever be,’ she went on.

‘I am so sick of seeing women that look the same. I am so sick of seeing manufactured, painted faces, with dyed hair in tiny dresses.

‘You’ve been spoon fed the wrong kind of pretty since you opened your eyes, and I’m sorry. I’m sorry you ever thought you were anything but the perfection you entered this world as.

'I'm sorry you thought you'd be more worthy, more beautiful if you tucked and plucked and sucked and painted it all away,' she continued in the post

‘I’m sorry you thought you’d be more worthy, more beautiful if you tucked and plucked and sucked and painted it all away,’ she continued in the post

The blonde-haired author said she wished she could 'hover over the plastic surgeon's desk' and tell the women to 'get out of here'

The blonde-haired author said she wished she could 'hover over the plastic surgeon's desk' and tell the women to 'get out of here'

The blonde-haired author said she wished she could ‘hover over the plastic surgeon’s desk’ and tell the women to ‘get out of here’

‘I’m sorry you thought you’d be more worthy, more beautiful if you tucked and plucked and sucked and painted it all away.

‘I’m sorry we live in a world where you believe the most important thing you can be is pretty.

‘It should be a crime to alter anything about our flesh – our meat bags are tired of being poked, prodded and stretched.

‘Un-do! Undo! Un-f***ing-do!’.

The blonde-haired author said she wished she could ‘hover over the plastic surgeon’s desk’ and tell the women to ‘get out of here’.  

‘Get into your soul – your soul is screaming that the only thing you need is your heart that beats and your spirit that cries and your feet that thuds to take over this earth.

A number of women have taken issue with the crusade for 'natural' beauty and posted scathing comments below the think piece

A number of women have taken issue with the crusade for ‘natural’ beauty and posted scathing comments below the think piece

According to research by McCrindle , one in four Australian women have tried liposuction, a breast augmentation or a facelift (Janne Robinson pictured)

According to research by McCrindle , one in four Australian women have tried liposuction, a breast augmentation or a facelift (Janne Robinson pictured)

‘Please, Jesus f***, stop sewing your a** to your face,’ the rant finished.

A number of women have taken issue with the crusade for ‘natural’ beauty and posted scathing comments below the think piece.

‘Oh and I’m currently waiting on plastic surgery for a breast reduction. My breasts cause me health issues. What’s your opinion on that?’ one commenter wrote.

‘It’s really easy for a conventionally attractive person to write something like this. I like you, Janne, but this is really misguided,’ another added.  

'It's really easy for a conventionally attractive person to write something like this. I like you, Janne, but this is really misguided,' another added

‘It’s really easy for a conventionally attractive person to write something like this. I like you, Janne, but this is really misguided,’ another added

According to research by McCrindle, one in four Australian women have tried liposuction, a breast augmentation or a facelift.

There has also been a general rise in lip fillers and butt implants since celebrities like Kylie Jenner and Kim Kardashian rose to prominence.

But there are no complete statistics for how many women have gone under the knife Down Under – a fact which may change as the trend continues to grow. 

Janne Robinson’s full response 

‘I believe we are born into this world worthy of love the moment we open our eyes. And that things happen to us, and we have experiences and then we forget this.

And then we go searching for this love externally in this world.

Many of us are not given the skills or tools to understand the emotional wounds we may have experienced that have developed into beliefs that lead to insecurity and low self esteem.

I wish that self love was taught in pre-school, but it isn’t.

Instead our daughters sit with their eyes glued to Cinderella, with a corset so tight her breasts bulge up to her eyes—face full of makeup, each curl perfect and we see the prince fall in love with her and think, ‘Yes, pretty. Pretty is what I will be.’

And then we see air brushed size zero models with blonde hair laughing in sports cars in marketing campaigns when we are teenagers and we’re fucked.

We unconsciously attach ‘pretty’ not only a body type but also to our worth as women in this world.

I want to unwire this. God, I want to unwire that so bad.

I want women to un-learn that their pant size or their cup size has anything to do with their worthiness.

If we want to radically shift our world we need to begin stepping over body image—trivial measurements of our worth and beauty, and relentlessly love ourselves.

A woman’s ‘realness’ and divinity has diddly squat to do with her waist size.

I want us to all love our juicy souls and fleshy bodies and ride the bus together free of compare, resent and judgements.

Our souls, our beauty, and our brilliance is not measured by something as trivial as our waist size or our exteriors.

I want to live in a world where women love themselves unconditionally—like mad.

So mad, that the madness of the body modification and beauty industry screeches to a halt.

I wrote the post after seeing a photograph of a woman who had so much plastic surgery done she didn’t even look like a person to me anymore. It saddened and enraged me.

I felt called to speak to it because I am seeing more and more body modification in the world, and it makes me wonder how many women are reflecting and doing the emotional work on why they want to change their bodies.

The conversation I wanted to have, is—are we doing the work to heal our emotional wounds that may have come from being bullied in middle school about that crook in our nose?

Are we sitting down and sitting with our pain from being made fun of and ostracized by our classmates and connecting it to a belief that we may have created which has now manifested as a insecurity about our nose, OR are we just buying a new one?

The work I want our world and women to do is the work to have an emotional awareness around themselves so that they can with clarity know where the choices they make for themselves come from, and why they are doing them.

I am not blind—I am a size zero, white, blonde female. I can understand how my voice speaking to this conversation I wanted to start deeply triggered women, however my meat bag never will stop me from speaking to things that make my spirit cry.

And what makes my spirit cry and hurt deeply is a world in which the cosmetic and plastic surgery industry and being ‘pretty’ trumps self development, reflection and emotional awareness.

I could never know or understand or speak to why every single woman has undergone plastic surgery or botox. I most definitely was not speaking to women getting breast reduction because they are having back problems.

The conversation I want to have globally, before I have a daughter, is what if investing in self love and body acceptance through emotional awareness was most important than being pretty?

Sometimes you need to make a big noise to get people to pay attention, and although not everyone heard what I wanted to say (which is— are we investing in self love and emotional awareness or are we unconsciously trying to cover up our wounds with plastic surgery), I am still grateful that a conversation is being had around it.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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