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Susie Burrell shares nutritional food alternatives you can buy at supermarkets for fraction the cost

Forget sashimi bowls and expensive cuts of meats, a nutritionist has revealed the simple food swaps that will save you time, money and calories.

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell said there are affordable supermarket products that contain just as much health benefits as expensive brands.

Appearing on Sunrise, she revealed the nutritional alternatives for breakfast, lunch, afternoon snack and dinner for a fraction of the cost.

For breakfast, the dietitian explained how Greek yoghurt was better nutritionally and cheaper than buying ‘expensive individual fruit yogurts’ (stock images)

Susie Burrell said there are affordable supermarket products that contain just as much health benefits as expensive brands

Susie Burrell said there are affordable supermarket products that contain just as much health benefits as expensive brands

BREAKFAST

For breakfast, Susie explained how homebrand products such as cereal and oats contain ‘exactly the same nutritional qualities’ as expensive brands.

To get the ‘perfect protein carbohydrate’ breakfast, Susie said a tub of Greek yogurt was better nutritionally and cheaper than buying ‘expensive individual fruit yoghurts’.

‘You’re paying a fraction of the price and it’s the same ingredients, if not, better nutritionally, you’re not getting the added sugars,’ she said.

LUNCH

Susie explained eating any kind of tinned beans, hummus, eggs or cottage cheese for lunch were great to curb the afternoon cravings.

‘It’s much much cheaper than things like sashimi bowls, tuna, salmon, or fresh meats you get in salads,’ she said. 

‘To get your protein at lunchtime, you could easily do it with beans. Now, people laugh about them but they’re really nutritious and they taste great with bread.

‘You can swap things like your protein bars which could cost $4-$5 for a single bar for things like cottage cheese, hummus, eggs, beans – a million times cheaper and again, you argue just as good, if not, better nutritionally.’

She said eating 20 grams of protein at lunch will keep you fuller for longer and you won’t be reaching for the sugary treats in the afternoon.

Susie explained eating baked beans, hummus, eggs or cottage cheese for lunch were great to curb the afternoon cravings because you’re fuller for longer (stock images)

For a healthier alternative snack in the afternoon, Susie suggested trying a nut spread with wholegrain crackers or bread (stock image)

For a healthier alternative snack in the afternoon, Susie suggested trying a nut spread with wholegrain crackers or bread (stock image)

AFTERNOON SNACK

For a healthier alternative snack in the afternoon, Susie suggested trying a nut spread with wholegrain crackers or bread.

‘Nuts can be very expensive – and if you’re not careful, you could eat them in one sitting,’ she said.

People can get the 100 per cent nut spreads that can contain a range of ‘superfoods’ such as chia and sesame seeds.

‘It’s going to last a lot longer – and a single serve with some wholegrain crackers is a great nutritious snack,’ she said.

Another snack can include cheese on crackers.

‘There’s no need to waste money on your spread. If you’re getting your good fats from olive oil, avocado or your nut spreads, you don’t need to add the margarine – that’s another way to save money at the supermarket,’ Susie said.

For dinner, Susie said eating mince chicken or turkey with brown rice contains lean protein 

For dinner, Susie said eating mince chicken or turkey with brown rice contains lean protein 

DINNER

‘The most expensive thing on our dinner plate in Australia is our meat portions because we have big slabs of meat that are relatively expensive,’ she said.

‘Even if you go for mince meat, if you’re going for good quality extra trim mince meat, it’s much more expensive.

‘But don’t forget your chicken and turkey mince – a fraction of the price, it tastes delicious, it’s lean protein and you don’t necessarily need to spend a lot on your red meat.’

For grains, Susie said choose brown rice instead of quinoa because they both contain the same nutrients and fibre.

‘You don’t have to go to the macro section of the supermarket and buy special kinds of grains,’ she said.



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