News, Culture & Society

Tammy Hembrow sparks a fierce debate after revealing she is mixed race

Tammy Hembrow’s ethnic heritage has come under scrutiny after she addressed the #BlackLivesMatter protests which have erupted in the US over the past week in response to the death of George Floyd.

The Australian influencer, 26, shared a post with her 11 million Instagram followers on Monday declaring her solidarity with anti-police brutality demonstrators.

She also acknowledged her ‘privileged’ position as a light-skinned woman, prompting one of her fans to point out that she’d previously identified as mixed race.

Discussion: Tammy Hembrow’s ethnic heritage has come under scrutiny after she addressed the #BlackLivesMatter protests that have erupted in the U.S. over the past week in response to the death of George Floyd

Tammy’s post read in part: ‘I know that I am privileged because of the colour of my skin and will never truly understand the injustices that have been going on since forever and that are still happening today.

‘I have many friends that are POC [people of colour] as well as family members and I am doing them a disservice by staying quiet on my platform with everything that is going on. I need you to know that I hear you and I stand with you.’

One of her followers replied, ‘But I thought you were a “person of colour”‘, which prompted Tammy to clarify her ethnic background.

Demonstrations: Anti-police brutality protests have erupted in at least 75 cities across the U.S. after the death in custody of unarmed black man George Floyd (pictured)

Demonstrations: Anti-police brutality protests have erupted in at least 75 cities across the U.S. after the death in custody of unarmed black man George Floyd (pictured) 

Statement: The Australian influencer, 26, shared this post with her 11 million Instagram followers on Monday declaring her solidarity with anti-police brutality demonstrators

Statement: The Australian influencer, 26, shared this post with her 11 million Instagram followers on Monday declaring her solidarity with anti-police brutality demonstrators

Race matters: She acknowledged her 'privileged' position as a light-skinned woman, prompting one of her fans to point out that she'd previously identified as mixed race

Race matters: She acknowledged her ‘privileged’ position as a light-skinned woman, prompting one of her fans to point out that she’d previously identified as mixed race

‘I am mixed,’ she wrote. ‘But when you look at me and don’t know me, you don’t see that by the colour of my skin.’

A discussion about Tammy’s racial heritage began in the comments section, as several fans noted that they ‘didn’t know she was mixed’ until she mentioned it.

Others said the businesswoman should be considered a person of colour because her mother, Nathalie Stanley, is Trinidadian. 

'I am mixed': One of her followers replied, 'But I thought you were a "person of colour"', which prompted Tammy to clarify her ethnic background

‘I am mixed’: One of her followers replied, ‘But I thought you were a “person of colour”‘, which prompted Tammy to clarify her ethnic background

Unexpected: A discussion about Tammy's racial heritage began in the comments section, as several fans noted that they 'didn't know she was mixed' until she mentioned it

Unexpected: A discussion about Tammy’s racial heritage began in the comments section, as several fans noted that they ‘didn’t know she was mixed’ until she mentioned it

'You are still black!' Others said the businesswoman should be considered a person of colour because her mother, Nathalie Stanley, is Trinidadian

‘You are still black!’ Others said the businesswoman should be considered a person of colour because her mother, Nathalie Stanley, is Trinidadian

‘You [are] still black, regardless of your complexion. Even your children have black features,’ one follower wrote.

Another commented: ‘Your mother is Trini, honey, you’re black. You’re a person of colour. Doesn’t matter if you’re mixed.’

Meanwhile, several fans agreed Tammy had made the right decision by acknowledging her privilege a light-skinned person despite having some black heritage.

'She made it clear she has privilege': Several fans agreed Tammy had made the right decision by acknowledging her privilege a light-skinned person despite having some black heritage

'She made it clear she has privilege': Several fans agreed Tammy had made the right decision by acknowledging her privilege a light-skinned person despite having some black heritage

‘She made it clear she has privilege’: Several fans agreed Tammy had made the right decision by acknowledging her privilege a light-skinned person despite having some black heritage

'You are barely mixed': A small number of followers seemed to miss the point of Tammy's comment about being mixed, saying she should just identify as white

‘You are barely mixed’: A small number of followers seemed to miss the point of Tammy’s comment about being mixed, saying she should just identify as white

One wrote: ‘Tammy made it clear she has this privilege because of her skin colour as people can’t tell she has colour in skin as she looks white.’

Another added: ‘If police pull her over, they see white. Even if she is multiracial.’

A small number of followers seemed to miss the point of Tammy’s comment about being mixed, saying she should just identify as white.

‘You are barely mixed, Tammy… just say you’re white and go,’ one of them wrote. 

Background: Tammy's father, Mark Hembrow, is a white Australian. Her mother, Nathalie Stanley (pictured), is of mixed heritage from Trinidad and Tobago

Background: Tammy’s father, Mark Hembrow, is a white Australian. Her mother, Nathalie Stanley (pictured), is of mixed heritage from Trinidad and Tobago 

Tammy’s father, Mark Hembrow, is a white Australian. Her mother, Nathalie Stanley, is of mixed heritage from Trinidad and Tobago. 

She explained her ethnic background in a YouTube video from 2018 entitled ‘Meet my mum’.

‘I told everyone how you’re from Trinidad and Tobago, and everyone is like, “Why isn’t she black?”‘ she said, addressing her mother.

‘I am black,’ replied Nathalie. 

When her daughter asked, ‘But why aren’t you [black] actually?’, Nathalie responded matter-of-factly: ‘It’s called mixed race.’

Turning the camera to herself, Tammy said: ‘Yeah, so my mum is actually from Trinidad and Tobago. My grandma is black.’

Unrest: Over the past week, hundreds of protests have unfolded in at least 75 cities across the United States in an unprecedented display of civil unrest following the killing of George Floyd. Pictured: protesters vandalising a car in Washington D.C., on May 31

Unrest: Over the past week, hundreds of protests have unfolded in at least 75 cities across the United States in an unprecedented display of civil unrest following the killing of George Floyd. Pictured: protesters vandalising a car in Washington D.C., on May 31

Anti-police brutality protests have erupted in at least 75 cities across the U.S. after the death in custody of unarmed black man George Floyd.

Floyd, 46, died last Monday after he was arrested by four Minneapolis police officers for allegedly using a fake $20 bill.

He was brought to the ground and white police officer Derek Chauvin pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes.

Floyd, who was unarmed and handcuffed, repeatedly said he couldn’t breathe and later died in custody.

The horrific assault was caught on video and sent shockwaves across the world.

Police brutality: Floyd, 46, died on Monday, May 25 after he was arrested by four Minneapolis police officers for allegedly using a fake $20 bill. He was brought to the ground and white cop Derek Chauvin pressed his knee on Floyd's neck for eight minutes

Police brutality: Floyd, 46, died on Monday, May 25 after he was arrested by four Minneapolis police officers for allegedly using a fake $20 bill. He was brought to the ground and white cop Derek Chauvin pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for eight minutes

Chauvin has been charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

He, along with the three other officers who arrested Floyd, have been fired from the force following outrage over the African American’s death.

Over the past week, hundreds of protests have unfolded in at least 75 cities across the United States in an unprecedented display of civil unrest.

At least 40 cities have imposed curfews in response to the riots and violence.

Curfews: At least 40 cities have imposed curfews in response to the riots and violence. Pictured: protesters starting a fire in Washington D.C., on May 31

Curfews: At least 40 cities have imposed curfews in response to the riots and violence. Pictured: protesters starting a fire in Washington D.C., on May 31

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.