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Taxpayers pay for convicted criminals to store their SPERM

Taxpayers foot the bill for convicted criminals to store their SPERM so they can father children when they are released from prison

  • Two criminals  made an application for sperm storage after medical treatment
  • The Corrective Services Commissioner can block the request if inappropriate
  • A corrective services spokeswoman said two have been approved in three years

Australian taxpayers paid for two convicted criminals to store their sperm so they can father children when they leave jail, it has been revealed.

The men who are behind bars in New South Wales have been undergoing medical treatment with Justice Health and Forensic Mental Health Network. 

Both cases have been approved in the last three years, but a Corrective Services NSW spokeswoman told the publication that applications are rare.

‘There are very rare cases where an inmate requires sperm to be stored due to a medical procedure such as chemotherapy that may affect their fertility,’ she said. 

Two unidentified criminals in New South Wales have applied to have their sperm frozen (stock image)

In 2006, the then-state government ruled that sperm freezing wouldn’t be available to convicted criminals jailed for crimes such as murder rape and terrorism.

The ruling came after a 22-year-old gang rapist used the service. 

Under the updated justice health prison policy, prisoners who have their fertility affected by medical treatments can have their sperm or eggs frozen.

Prisoners can also apply for cosmetic surgery, tattoo removal and treatments for diabetes, hearing or vision loss and dental problems (stock image)

Prisoners can also apply for cosmetic surgery, tattoo removal and treatments for diabetes, hearing or vision loss and dental problems (stock image)

Prisoners can also apply for cosmetic surgery, tattoo removal and treatments for diabetes, hearing or vision loss and dental problems.

Both prisoners made an application for sperm storage which has been referred to  Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin, The Daily Telegraph reported.  

Mr Severin can block the request if he the criminal is a serious offender and he thinks it’s inappropriate.

Guidelines state cosmetic surgery and tattoo removal are only available under life-threatening circumstances, or in cases where an inmate has suffered physical trauma, burns or deformities.

‘It is our understanding that CSNSW has not approval any requests for elective, non-essential, surgeries or procedures,’ said the spokeswoman. 

Inmates can also apply for chiropractic, iridology, naturopathy, homeopathy and aromatherapy options, at their own expense. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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