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Teacher wipe cosmetics off girls to stop them wearing makeup in school

Chinese school teacher uses a cleaning cloth to wipe cosmetics off female students’ faces to stop them wearing makeup on campus

  • Footage shows a male teacher dipping a cloth in a bucket of water in China
  • He then uses the fabric to rub the face of one girl in front of a group of students
  • The video sparks a debate on whether or not pupils should wear makeup in class
  • School said most students lived away from their parents and needed guidance 

A secondary school in China has sparked controversy after a teacher was filmed wiping cosmetics off female students’ faces before letting them enter the campus.  

A spokesman of the school in rural Guizhou Province said many students had been wearing heavy makeup to class and the school decided to ban the act.

He said most of the students were the so-called ‘left-behind’ children whose parents lived and worked in big cities, therefore teachers felt responsible to look after them and provide them with proper guidance.

The teacher is seen using the cloth to wipe cosmetics off a girl (right) in front of a group of students

Viral footage shows a teacher in China’s Guizhou Province dipping a cloth into a bucket of water (left) before using it to wipe cosmetics off a girl (right) in front of a group of students

The incident took place yesterday outside the Number Three Secondary School of Sansui County, reported Beijing News.

The student were said to be returning to school after a holiday. 

The footage shows a group of girls queuing outside the school in front of one teacher, who takes the rag and scrubs it on one girl’s face, wiping off her makeup before dipping it into the bucket and moving on to the next pupil. 

Chinese web users have been debating whether or not it is appropriate for students to wear makeup in school after the video sparked controversy

The school has a no-makeup policy

Chinese web users have been debating whether or not it is appropriate for students to wear makeup in school after the video sparked controversy. The school has a no-makeup policy

The short clip was said to be filmed by a witnessing teacher.

He can be heard yelling in the local dialect ‘that red eye-shadow is trending this year’ when his colleague rubs the face of one student.  

The video has gone viral on Weibo, China’s equivalent to Twitter, sparking a debate on whether or not it is appropriate for students to wear makeup.

A poll on the social media platform shows 64 per cent of participants agree with the school’s policy. 

The incident took place in the county of Sansui in China's rural Guizhou province (pictured)

The incident took place in the county of Sansui in China’s rural Guizhou province (pictured)

One supporter said: ‘If they were my children, I would not let them show off and use cosmetics in middle school and high school.’

Another one wrote: ‘No makeup should be allowed on campus for students in high school and below.’

A third one commented: ‘This teacher is a responsible teacher and deserves our respect.’ 

But many also criticised the way the school had handled the matter.

One typical comment read: ‘Students shouldn’t use makeup, but the teacher’s method is not correct either. Don’t students have dignity?’

Another opposed: ‘Does the teacher have the right to remove the makeup from students by force?’ 

More than nine million children have been 'left behind' in China's countryside by their parents who have

The school said 90 per cent of their students were ‘left-behind’ children whose parents lived and worked in big cities. There are over nine million ‘left-behind’ children in China (file photo)

A spokesman of the school told Litchi News it was the first time the school had used this method.

‘Many outsiders don’t know the situation here. Our economy is lagging behind, and around 90 per cent of our students are left-behind children. Their parents left them [here] to work [in the city],’ he said.

‘In many ways, they lack the guidance and company of their parents. Therefore they have formed radical aesthetic standards and life values.’ 

The spokesman said the management had failed to curb the trend of students wearing heavy makeup on campus. 

He admitted that the method might be inappropriate, but the school wanted to live up to its responsibility of educating children.  

He also claimed that less students were caught with makeup after the incident.

What are China’s ‘left-behind’ children?

'Left-behind' children often live in the poorest parts of China, such as Yunnan (pictured)

‘Left-behind’ children often live in the poorest parts of China, such as Yunnan (pictured)

More than nine million children have been ‘left behind’ in China’s countryside, according to latest statistics released by Beijing in 2016.

Their parents are migrant workers who decide to move to the cities to find job in order to make money. 

Many of these migrant worker parents claim they have no other choices than leaving their rural hometowns for a living. 

Their children would have limited access to schooling and healthcare in the cities under China’s household registration system, forcing them to be left with relatives. 

The plight of their children is one of the most emotive consequences of China’s decades-long economic boom. 

These children are usually looked after by grandparents but sometimes have no guardians at all. 

In most cases, they see their mother and father only once a year around the Lunar New Year.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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