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Tech billionaire pays $10K to die and have his brain uploaded online

Entreprenuer Sam Altman is one of 25 people on a waiting list at Nectome, a startup company that alleges to upload a person’s brain into a computer so they can live forever, according to the New York Post

A Silicone Valley tech-billionaire is paying $10,000 for an early death in exchange for a promise to live forever. 

Entreprenuer Sam Altman is one of 25 people on a waiting list at Nectome, a startup company that alleges to upload a person’s brain into a computer so they can live forever, according to the New York Post. 

But in exchange for eternally preserving his mind, the 32-year-old will have to die first.

Somewhat ironically, the company Altman founded – Y Combinator – funds startups like Nectome.  

The process he’s signed up for involves embalming the brain so it can later be simulated onto a computer, according to the MIT Technology Review.

The customer, alive, is hooked up to a machine and then injected with Nectome’s embalming chemicals. 

The company said the method is ‘100 percent fatal.’ 

On the company's website, it says the mission is to 'preserve your brain well enough to keep all its memories intact: from that great chapter of your favorite book to the feeling of cold winter air, baking an apple pie, or having dinner with your friends and family'

On the company’s website, it says the mission is to ‘preserve your brain well enough to keep all its memories intact: from that great chapter of your favorite book to the feeling of cold winter air, baking an apple pie, or having dinner with your friends and family’

‘The user experience will be identical to physician assisted suicide,’ Nectome’s co-founder Robert McIntyre told the Review. 

On the company’s website, it says the mission is to ‘preserve your brain well enough to keep all its memories intact: from that great chapter of your favorite book to the feeling of cold winter air, baking an apple pie, or having dinner with your friends and family.

‘We believe that within the current century it will be feasible to digitize this information and use it to recreate your consciousness.’  

The practice does qualify as physician-assisted suicide, which is currently only legal in five out of the 50 states. 

'The user experience will be identical to physician assisted suicide,' Nectome's co-founder Robert McIntyre (left) told the MIT Technology Review

Co-founder Michael McCanna

‘The user experience will be identical to physician assisted suicide,’ Nectome’s co-founder Robert McIntyre (left) told the MIT Technology Review. Pictured right is the other co-founder Michael McCanna

And even in those states, an individual must have a terminal illness and have been told they will only live for six months or less. 

The idea of uploading human conscisouness into computers or storing it on the cloud is gaining popularity among scientists in Silicone Valley. 

Dr Ian Pearson, a futurologist, said he believes in 50 years time humans will be able to put our brains onto the cloud in an interview with the Sun. 

He said a person would then be able to ‘use any android that you feel like it to inhibit the real world.’  



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk