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TfL proposes hiked £160 fines for driver breaking rules on Red Routes

Sadiq Khan’s new sting on drivers: Motorists caught breaking rules on the capital’s network of Red Routes could soon be hit with maximum fines of £160 – up from £130 – under a proposal made public by Transport for London on Thursday 

Transport for London has today launched a new public consultation to increase the maximum fine on the capital’s Red Routes by £30.

The move looks set to become another sting on drivers in the capital following last week’s announcement that the temporarily increased Congestion Charge of £15 will remain and just two months ahead of the expansion of the Ultra Low Emission Zone that will cost thousands of drivers £12.50 to enter. 

A hike to fine amounts for Red Route offences, such as blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes, would see motorists receive a maximum penalty charge notice (PCN) of £160, up from £130.

Red Routes, which are managed by TfL, make up around five per cent of London’s road network. However, they are also some of the busiest in the city, carrying around 40 per cent of traffic.

The RAC blasted the move, saying it is ‘nothing more than a money-grab’ and that the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, is ‘waging a war on drivers and businesses that rely on their vehicles’.

TfL confirmed the potential hike on Thursday, claiming it is part of efforts to cut road danger and congestion. 

In a statement it said: ‘Fines would be reduced to £80 if paid within 14 days. 

‘All income from PCNs is re-invested by TfL, to cover the cost of enforcement and schemes to reduce road danger.’ 

A public consultation has been launched on TfL’s website, which will be gauging opinion on the proposed hikes up until September 19. 

If the decision to increase fine amounts is progressed, it would be the first rise for 10 years. 

TfL says the proposed increase to £160 is ‘in line with inflation since the last increase’. 

It added that by increasing fine amounts for offences such as illegal parking it would deter motorists from breaking rules and therefore prevent the obstruction of ‘vital deliveries and collections’ and reduce delays for buses and emergency services.

Motorists who are caught blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes on the capital's Red Routes would receive a maximum penalty charge notice of £160. Early payment (within 14 days) would reduce the fine to £80

Motorists who are caught blocking yellow box junctions, breaking parking rules, performing illegal turns and driving in bus lanes on the capital’s Red Routes would receive a maximum penalty charge notice of £160. Early payment (within 14 days) would reduce the fine to £80

Red Routes (marked here in the appropriate colour), which are managed by TfL, make up around 5% of London's road network. However, they are also some of the busiest in the city, carrying around 40% of traffic in the capital

Red Routes (marked here in the appropriate colour), which are managed by TfL, make up around 5% of London’s road network. However, they are also some of the busiest in the city, carrying around 40% of traffic in the capital

Making the announcement, Siwan Hayward, TfL’s director of compliance and policing, said: ‘London’s network of red routes plays a vital role in keeping people moving across the capital and it’s really important that everybody follows the rules that are in place to keep roads clear and to keep people safe. 

‘We’d much rather people follow the rules than fine them, and the proposed increase in fines is intended to increase compliance with the rules and make streets safer, cleaner and less congested for everyone. 

‘I’d urge people to have their say on these proposals and we welcome all feedback on our plans.’

Nicolas Lyes, head of roads police at the RAC, said the proposal to hike fines is 'nothing more than a money-grab' and feels like the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, is 'waging a war on drivers and businesses that rely on their vehicles'

Nicolas Lyes, head of roads police at the RAC, said the proposal to hike fines is ‘nothing more than a money-grab’ and feels like the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, is ‘waging a war on drivers and businesses that rely on their vehicles’

The proposals for larger fines comes just a week after TfL announced that the ‘temporary’ increase to the Congestion Charge – up from £11.50 to £15 – would be made permanent, though the hours of operation reduced.

It recently confirmed the rollout of up to 50 new ‘smart cameras’ across London’s roads that will help enforce rules and reduce road deaths. 

The consultation end will also come just a month ahead of the extension to the capital’s Ultra Low Emission Zone, which will cover the entirety of London between the North and South Circular Roads and change drivers of non-compliant older vehicles £12.50 a day each time they get behind the wheel. 

This is Money revealed last month that City Hall rake in an extra £107million from the first year ULEZ was operational, having launched the zone in April 2019. 

RAC head of roads policy, Nicholas Lyes, slammed the proposal for higher fine amounts. 

‘Only last week, the Mayor announced hikes to the Congestion Charge, and now he follows this up with an unnecessary hike in the penalty charge level,’ he said.

‘The previous levy should have been a sufficient enough deterrent to prevent contraventions, so this rise appears to be nothing more than a money-grab. 

‘It is starting to feel like the Mayor of London is waging a war on drivers and businesses that rely on their vehicles with another eye-watering hike.’

Red Routes are designed to prevent congestion on London's most heavily used roads. Single and double red lines ban all stopping, parking and loading. A single red line usually means restrictions apply at peak hours, though a double red line (as seen here) applies at all times

Red Routes are designed to prevent congestion on London’s most heavily used roads. Single and double red lines ban all stopping, parking and loading. A single red line usually means restrictions apply at peak hours, though a double red line (as seen here) applies at all times

Red Routes are recognisable for their painted red ‘no-stopping’ lines and signs on designated routes.  

Single and double red lines ban all stopping, parking and loading. Double red lines apply at all times and single red lines usually apply during the working day. 

They are designed to keep traffic flowing and prohibit drivers from stopping except for in designated areas. 

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