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The Bachelorette’s Jarrod Woodgate moved to Darwin because his friends were unsupportive of him

The Bachelorette’s Jarrod Woodgate reveals he was forced to move to Darwin because his friends in Melbourne were not supportive of his mental health

Jarrod Woodgate has revealed he moved to Darwin to focus on his mental health after discovering his friends in Melbourne were unsupportive of him.

The 36-year-old Bachelorette alum said he had no regrets about switching states, explaining his decision.

‘My friends in Melbourne, they’re not overly supportive of my mental health,’ he told Yahoo Lifestyle on Thursday, t, adding that he felt ‘judged’. 

Fresh start: Jarrod Woodgate has revealed he moved to Darwin to focus on his mental health after discovering his friends in Melbourne were unsupportive of him

‘They think because I’ve got such a good life that there’s nothing wrong with me. They look at all the happy snaps on Instagram, but mental health is not visible.

‘You can’t see mental health. It’s not like a broken arm or a fractured collarbone. It’s deep down and people won’t talk to you about it until they feel comfortable and confident that they won’t be judged.’

Following his own experience, Jarrod said he hoped to help others struggling with their mental health by creating a safe space for them to come forward. 

Moving on: In an interview with Yahoo Lifestyle on Thursday, the 36-year-old Bachelorette alum said he had no regrets about switching states, explaining his decision

Moving on: In an interview with Yahoo Lifestyle on Thursday, the 36-year-old Bachelorette alum said he had no regrets about switching states, explaining his decision

‘After what I’ve been through, I want to try and assist other people, or at least help them or make them feel like they can be open, either with a stranger, a neighbour, a friend – anyone that will listen,’ he added.

Jarrod said he ‘escaped’ to Darwin in March 2021 because ‘everyone’s very chilled’, and described it as ‘a great place to focus on mental health’.

He confessed that he cries ‘more than any other person I know’, and added that people should take what they see on social media lightly. 

'My friends in Melbourne, they're not overly supportive of my mental health,' he admitted, adding that he felt 'judged'. Pictured with girlfriend Sam Royce

‘My friends in Melbourne, they’re not overly supportive of my mental health,’ he admitted, adding that he felt ‘judged’. Pictured with girlfriend Sam Royce

‘You can’t go, “Oh, they look happy because they’re loved up and they’re on a holiday.” Well, that morning, I could have been in my room crying for hours before we went,’ he added.

Jarrod has spoken extensively about his battle with mental health, revealing he’s ‘been diagnosed with PTSD, depression, anxiety and trauma’.

He previously served 12 years in the Australian Army before being medically discharged, and admitted his time in the military had left his body ‘fried’.

'They think because I've got such a good life that there's nothing wrong with me. They look at all the happy snaps on Instagram, but mental health is not visible,' he said of his friends

‘They think because I’ve got such a good life that there’s nothing wrong with me. They look at all the happy snaps on Instagram, but mental health is not visible,’ he said of his friends

‘It takes its toll, it really does. I mean, I’m at the age of 36 and I feel like I’m 80 because of either my mind or my body. It physically can’t do what it should be able to do as a 36-year-old,’ he added.

In November, Jarrod detailed his battle with mental illness in an open letter to his girlfriend Sam Royce on Instagram.

‘Thank you for being a supportive girlfriend and a massive shout out to those that have experienced or currently experiencing mental health hurdles in life,’ he wrote.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health, contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636.   

'You can't see mental health. It's not like a broken arm or a fractured collarbone. It's deep down and people won't talk to you about it until they feel comfortable and confident that they won't be judged,' he said

‘You can’t see mental health. It’s not like a broken arm or a fractured collarbone. It’s deep down and people won’t talk to you about it until they feel comfortable and confident that they won’t be judged,’ he said

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