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The best secret spots to visit in Australia after coronavirus restrictions ease

Australians itching to getaway can finally start planning their dream holiday after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced interstate travel could resume as early as July.

State borders were shut at the height of the coronavirus pandemic and people were only allowed to venture as far as the nearest grocery store.

But on Friday Mr Morrison announced a three step plan to ease COVID-19 restrictions, with travel to come in the third and final stage assumed to be in July.

Under the first step, gatherings of up to ten people will be allowed and cafes and restaurants can re-open with a maximum of ten people at one time.

The second stage will allow gatherings of up to 20 people and Aussies can expect to hit the gym, cinema and get some much needed beauty treatment.

Some interstate travel will also be allowed during phase two. 

Step three involves gatherings of up to 100 people, opening up food courts and saunas and bath houses – along with all interstate travel.

While a trip to Bali or Hawaii is still off the cards, Daily Mail Australia reveals the best hidden gems to visit once travel resumes – and they’re all sitting in our backyard. 

Little Beach in Albany, Western Australia is one of the country’s most secluded beaches despite having crystal clear water and white sandy shores

Little Beach, Albany, Western Australia 

With dazzling turquoise waters and white sandy shores, Little Beach is one of Western Australia’s most beautiful secrets.

Nestled in between the Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve, the beach is reached by walking along the Heritage Trail.

Once arriving at the crystal clear, secluded beach visitors can enjoy a day of fishing, snorkelling or take a walk through the surrounding bush.

Little Beach sits around 30km east from the small town of Albany and as many people don’t even know its there, you’re nearly always guaranteed to have the beach to yourself.

Little Beach sits around 30km east from the small town of Albany and as many people don't even know its there, you're nearly always guaranteed to have the beach to yourself

Little Beach sits around 30km east from the small town of Albany and as many people don’t even know its there, you’re nearly always guaranteed to have the beach to yourself 

The Butterfly Gorge in Northern Territory's Nitmiluk National Park is another well kept secret

The Butterfly Gorge in Northern Territory’s Nitmiluk National Park is another well kept secret

Butterfly Gorge, Nitmiluk National Park,  Katherine, Northern Territory

While the Nitmiluk Park in Katherine is not exactly a secret, few know of the real beauty that is the Butterfly Gorge.

Named after the abundance of butterflies that fill the area, there are several rock pools to swim in.

But after a short swim and climb through the rocks, you’ll find yourself in a tranquil gorge with nearly nobody in sight.

People can escape to this beauty by swimming through the pools and climbing through the rocks.

Visitors can camp at the nearby Tjuwaliyan  Hot Springs or Douglas River Esplanade Conservation Area. 

Named after the abundance of butterflies that fill the area, there are several rock pools to swim in

Named after the abundance of butterflies that fill the area, there are several rock pools to swim in

Baird Bay in South Australia is home to thousands of sea lions and dolphins. Visitors can even swim with the local wildlife

Baird Bay in South Australia is home to thousands of sea lions and dolphins. Visitors can even swim with the local wildlife all available to swim with

Baird Bay, South Australia 

Baird Bay is one of the few places on earth you can swim with wild dolphins and seals.

The seaside village is full of activities for visitors including camping, shark cage diving and swimming expeditions that will bring you face to face with a pack of sea lions.

The bay is also teaming with fish with visitors guaranteed to catch something during their stay.

It sits on the the west coast of the state’s Eyre Peninsula and also offers beautiful bush walks and bird watching.

The seaside village is full of activities for visitors including camping, shark cage diving and swimming expeditions that will bring you face to face with a pack of sea lions

The seaside village is full of activities for visitors including camping, shark cage diving and swimming expeditions that will bring you face to face with a pack of sea lions

The Crystal Shower Falls in NSW's Dorrigo National Park is another must visit for Australians looking for the perfect staycation

The Crystal Shower Falls in NSW’s Dorrigo National Park is another must visit for Australians looking for the perfect staycation 

Crystal Shower Falls, Dorrigo National Park, NSW 

A walk through a lush green rainforest will lead you to the Crystal Shower Falls, one of New South Wales’ most stunning waterfalls.

Visitors can even climb a bridge that takes them behind the waterfall into a rocky cavern.

The falls are part of the Gondwana Rainforest which is over one million years old, full of towering trees with roots intertwined. 

Visitors can even climb a bridge that takes them behind the waterfall into a rocky cavern (pictured: Crystal Shower Falls)

Visitors can even climb a bridge that takes them behind the waterfall into a rocky cavern (pictured: Crystal Shower Falls)

Mackerel Islands, Western Australia

Western Australia’s Mackerel Islands are a collection of ten secluded islands sitting off the coast. 

Two of the islands have accommodation so tourists can stay over but those looking to splash the cash can rent out the Direction Island all to themselves.    

Thevenard Island offers a selection of cabins for holidaymakers and the waters surrounding the island are teaming with wildlife with many species never coming into contact with humans before.

Tourists can enjoy kayaking, snorkelling and turtle and whale watching.

Western Australia's Mackerel Islands are a collection of ten secluded islands sitting off the west coast

Western Australia’s Mackerel Islands are a collection of ten secluded islands sitting off the west coast

Little Blue Lake, North East Tasmania 

One of Tasmania’s natural phenomenons is also one of the state’s best kept secrets.

The Little Blue Lake located in the state’s north-east is a deep rich aqua colour from the minerals left over from old mining sites.

Despite the inviting-looking waters, swimmers are told to steer clear of the lake as it can be highly acidic.

Visitors are encouraged to enjoy a picnic near the water or take a ride on the nearby mountain bike trails. 

The Little Blue Lake located in the state's north-east is a deep rich aqua colour from the minerals left over from old mining sites

The Little Blue Lake located in the state’s north-east is a deep rich aqua colour from the minerals left over from old mining sites

Satellite Island and Granite Point Pier, Tasmania 

Tasmania is also home to hidden gems Satellite Island and Granite Point Pier.

Satellite Island is found off the south coast and is a private island available to be rented out for anyone keen to make a visit.

Guests can stay for $1,950 a night and will have the entire island to themselves, choosing to stay in the three-bedroom home or the boat house.

The island can be reached by a ferry and once tourists arrive they can enjoy paddle boarding, kayaking or simply take in their surroundings. 

Satellite Island is found off the south coast and is a private island available to be rented out for anyone keen to make a visit

Satellite Island is found off the south coast and is a private island available to be rented out for anyone keen to make a visit

Granite Point Pier in the state's north-east was once a well built boardwalk stretching into the ocean off Bridport but was burnt to a crisp by arsonists in 1938

Granite Point Pier in the state’s north-east was once a well built boardwalk stretching into the ocean off Bridport but was burnt to a crisp by arsonists in 1938

Granite Point Pier in the state’s north-east was once a well built boardwalk stretching into the ocean off Bridport but was burnt to a crisp by arsonists in 1938.

Visitors can now see the eerie remains of what is left of the pier. 

Keswick Island, Queensland 

Keswick Island is one of the lesser known vacation spots in the Whitsundays known for being a base for snorkelling in the Great Barrier Reef.

Whale watching tours are also available along with 40 different species of birds.

Keswick Island also prides itself on its delicious honey and visitors are encouraged not to leave without picking up a jar.

Keswick Island is one of the lesser known vacation spots in the Whitsundays known for being a base for snorkelling in the Great Barrier Reef

Keswick Island is one of the lesser known vacation spots in the Whitsundays known for being a base for snorkelling in the Great Barrier Reef

Three Hummock Island, Tasmania 

Three Hummock Island is another private island where visitors can stay in almost total isolation.

For just $90 a night, travellers can swim in crystal clear waters without anyone else around – except for the island’s managers.

There are no bars, shops or restaurants and the only way to get there is via boat or seaplane.

Three Hummock Island is another private island where visitors can stay in almost total isolation

Three Hummock Island is another private island where visitors can stay in almost total isolation

Manning Gorge in the Kimberley, Western Australia 

Located in the heart of the Kimberly region, Manning Gorge is one of the state’s best swimming spots.

It’s about a 3km walk to the top of the gorge where tourists can then spend their time swimming in the many rock pools.

Visitors have the choice of swimming 100m across a river to reach the gorge or using a dinghy. Camping is also available nearby.

Located in the heart of the Kimberley region, Manning Gorge is one of the state's best swimming spots

Located in the heart of the Kimberley region, Manning Gorge is one of the state’s best swimming spots

Maria Island, Tasmania

Hidden off the state’s east coast lies Maria Island, a secluded paradise with no cars, shops and hardly any people.

Visitors are encouraged to visit the Painted Cliffs which involves beautifully coloured rocks that were shaped by minerals in the water and erosion from the wind.

Travellers can choose to hike or swim and can even see some of Australia’s most endangered species like Tasmanian Devils and forester kangaroos.

Visitors are encouraged to visit the Painted Cliffs in Maria Island, Tasmania which involves beautifully coloured rocks that were shaped by minerals in the water and erosion from the wind

Visitors are encouraged to visit the Painted Cliffs in Maria Island, Tasmania which involves beautifully coloured rocks that were shaped by minerals in the water and erosion from the wind

Daly Waters, Northern Territory 

Daly Waters is one of the Northern Territory’s quirkiest towns accustomed with a local pub that shares the same name.

It’s a common stop off point for those on long road trips with many leaving behind shirts and even bras that now hang off the pub’s walls.

The pub was built in the 1930s and the owners believe a ghost lingers in the kitchen after a woman was murdered at the site.

Daly Waters is one of the Northern Territory's quirkiest towns accustomed with a local pub that shares the same name

Daly Waters is one of the Northern Territory’s quirkiest towns accustomed with a local pub that shares the same name

Hahndorf, South Australia

Hahndorf is a small town in Adelaide Hills that resembles a city straight out of Germany.

It was founded by German immigrants and keeps up the appearance with pubs and restaurants all serving German cuisine.

Even the accommodation mimics a German village but few know such a unique place even exists in South Australia.

Hahndorf is a small town in Adelaide Hills that resembles a city straight out of Germany

Hahndorf is a small town in Adelaide Hills that resembles a city straight out of Germany

Talbot Bay, the Kimberleys, Western Australia

Talbot Bay is known for its remarkable horizontal waterfalls that were once described by nature and wildlife expert David Attenborough as ‘one of the greatest natural wonders of the world’.

The waterfalls flow horizontally instead of vertically due to tidal currents moving through narrow gorges which pushes the water into rapid like formations.

The breathtaking site is only available by helicopter or plane but is highly recommended for anyone travelling to the Kimberley region. 

Talbot Bay is known for its remarkable horizontal waterfalls that were once described by nature and wildlife expert David Attenborough as 'one of the greatest natural wonders of the world'

Talbot Bay is known for its remarkable horizontal waterfalls that were once described by nature and wildlife expert David Attenborough as ‘one of the greatest natural wonders of the world’

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