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The biggest home decorating mistakes people make in their twenties

Interior designers reveal the biggest home decorating mistakes people make – and why you should ditch the ‘bold’ paint on your walls now

  • A collection of interior designers have shared the errors they notice in a house
  • If you’re a first home decorator you’ll likely make one of these mistakes yourself
  • They are adding bold colours, having lots of trends and mixing up measurements
  • It’s best to get inspiration from home-related magazines, but don’t copy

Whether you’re a first-time decorator or just clueless when it comes to interiors, Australian experts have pointed out the key design issues they immediately notice upon entering a house.

Plenty of amateurs believe wallpaper should be bright, empty space in a property should be filled and that measuring furniture should just be ‘guessed’ but if you’ve tried any of these before you’re not on track to becoming a contestant on The Block.

Instead you should have a clear direction from the outset and understand that key pieces are more showstopping than clutter.

So which of these mistakes do you need to correct?

Ensure you have a clear direction – and a measuring tape – before you start purchasing furniture and renovating your home (stock image)

1. Still decorating with posters

Put down the Blu Tack and throw that ode to One Direction away because pasting tacky posters on your walls is a practice best left behind with high school.

Vice president of style at Modsy, Alessandra Wood, told My Domaine it’s best to invest in framed art to decorate your walls – and you don’t have to break your budget to secure them.

Local markets and Etsy should have numerous options for prints, and frames can be found at Target, IKEA or EQ3.  

Keen decorators can even create their own gallery wall out of prints and family photos, so it’s classy but filled with momentos at the same time. 

Put down the Blu Tack and throw that ode to One Direction away because pasting tacky posters on your walls is a practice best left behind with high school (stock image)

Put down the Blu Tack and throw that ode to One Direction away because pasting tacky posters on your walls is a practice best left behind with high school (stock image)

2.  Failing to measure anything before buying it

It can be a pain to get out an old measuring tape and plan a room down to the last centimetre, but it will make a tremendous difference in the long run.

Gabriela Gargano from Grisoro Designs said it’s common to outfit your house with pieces that are too big or too small for the space but they can put a dampener on the style you’re trying to achieve.

If you do accidentally purchase something – and can’t return it – try to sell it on Facebook marketplace rather than attempting to make it work in your home.

It can be a pain to get out an old measuring tape and plan a room down to every last centimetre, but it will make a tremendous difference in the long run (stock image)

It can be a pain to get out an old measuring tape and plan a room down to every last centimetre, but it will make a tremendous difference in the long run (stock image)

3.  Using a bold colour on the walls

‘Without a lot of experience with paint, it can be easy to assume the colour of your favorite t-shirt will translate into a great wall colour,’ Amber Dunford from Overstock told the publication.

Sadly this is very rarely the case and you’re better off sticking to a more neutral shade like pastel to ensure the room feels light and bright.

It’s better to introduce colour in the form of a dressing table, an artwork or even a rug.

'Without a lot of experience with paint, it can be easy to assume the colour of your favorite T-shirt will translate into a great wall colour,' Amber Dunford from Overstock said (stock image)

‘Without a lot of experience with paint, it can be easy to assume the colour of your favorite T-shirt will translate into a great wall colour,’ Amber Dunford from Overstock said (stock image)

4. Not allowing for any blank space

Amateur designers often feel the need to fill every square inch of a room with furniture, lights and material possessions.

‘Overfilling the walls with art, cramming too many chairs into a seating group, or lining the perimeter of the space with furniture, leaves no rest for the eye or negative space,’ Ms Dunford said.

There needs to be ample walkway space around furniture so people can comfortably walk between everything.

Trying to fill every space with an object? Your eyes will quickly become overwhelmed by all of the clutter (stock image)

Trying to fill every space with an object? Your eyes will quickly become overwhelmed by all of the clutter (stock image)

5.  Having too many trends competing in the room 

Even if you’ve read every Australian copy of Better Homes and Gardens try not to include every pull-out ‘trend’ you can find in the one space.

‘It’s easy to get caught up in the “of the moment” look and within a few months you have a house full of mismatched styles,’ CEO of Parachute, Ariel Kaye, said.

Before you purchase something new give yourself a few days to process whether it fits your aesthetic, rather than making spur of the moment decisions. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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