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The Empire State Building remains in darkness to honor Pittsburgh synagogue massacre victims

The Empire State Building switched off its lights tonight to remember victims of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.

Management at the New York landmark announced on Twitter that the landmark tower would remain dark to honor the 11 killed and six wounded at Tree of Life Congregation in Squirrel Hill.

However an orange halo appeared at the top of the tower to highlight the scourge of gun violence in America.

The tower lights of the Empire State Building (pictured) remain in darkness tonight to remember those killed and injured in Saturday’s Pittsburgh terror attack 

The Empire State Building as it normally appears with its tower lights shining brightly 

The Empire State Building as it normally appears with its tower lights shining brightly 

The gesture was one of several events that took place this weekend to honor the victims of the attack. 

A tweet on the Empire State Building’s account read: ‘In sympathy for the victims of the attack in Pittsburgh, our tower lights will go dark tonight. Our mast will display an orange halo shining a light on gun violence awareness.

Robert Bowers, 46, is suspected of killing 11 and wounding six, including four police officers, when he entered Tree of Life Congregation and opened fire.

He faces 29 federal charges, 22 of which are punishable by death, US Attorney Scott Brady said.

The Pittsburgh Steelers and Cleveland Browns observed a moment of silence at Pittsburgh’s Heinz Field for the 11 people killed by a gunman inside a synagogue in the city Saturday.

After pulling out a 33-18 win, quarterback Ben Roethlisberger paid tribute to tribute to a former team staffer affected by the tragedy.

‘I’d like to start with saying our thoughts, love, and prayers go to all of the victims of yesterday’s senseless shooting in Squirrel Hill especially from me and family to Michele [Rosenthal]’.

A memorial of flowers and stars outside the Tree of Life Synagogue where Saturday's attack happened 

A memorial of flowers and stars outside the Tree of Life Synagogue where Saturday’s attack happened 

Roethlisberger said of the team’s former community relations manager, whose brothers Cecil Rosenthal and David Rosenthal were among those killed Saturday. ‘We love you Michele and we are thinking about you.’

A design based on the Pittsburgh Steelers’ helmet logo – inserting a Star of David – appeared on the internet and was displayed at Heinz Field.

Israel also paid tribute to the victims of Saturday’s massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue with messages of solidarity.

The Pittsburgh Steelers observe a moment's silence before their game against Cleveland 

The Pittsburgh Steelers observe a moment’s silence before their game against Cleveland 

A Pittsburgh Steelers fan holds a sign honoring the victims of Saturday's synagogue attack 

A Pittsburgh Steelers fan holds a sign honoring the victims of Saturday’s synagogue attack 

Projected images on the walls of Jerusalem’s Old City showed the Israeli and American flags side by side with the caption ‘We are with you, Pittsburgh!’

The mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh left 11 people dead and wounded six others.

Israel’s cabinet stood for a moment’s silence on Sunday to honor the victims of the 11 slain worshippers.

Supporters of the Jewish community hold a candlelit vigil outside the White House 

Supporters of the Jewish community hold a candlelit vigil outside the White House 

A candlelight vigil in front of the White House also took place this evening after the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue.

Pittsburgh authorities have released the identities of all 11 victims, including two brothers, a dentist, and a new grandfather, who were gunned down while worshipping at the synagogue.

Joyce Fienberg, 75, Richard Gottfried, 65, Jerry Rabinowitz, 66, Cecil Rosenthal, 59, David Rosenthal, 54, Bernice Simon, 84, Sylvan Simon, 86, Daniel Stein, 71, Melvin Wax, 88, Rose Mallinger, 97, and 69-year-old Irving Younger were identified as the 11 victims by Chief Medical Examiner Dr Karl Williams Sunday morning.

A projected image of solidarity with Pittsburgh is displayed in Jersualem's Old City 

A projected image of solidarity with Pittsburgh is displayed in Jersualem’s Old City 

David and Cecil Rosenthal were brothers and Sylvan and Bernice Simon were husband and wife. Stein, who had recently become a grandfather, was identified as the first victim by relatives on Saturday.

David DeFelice was paired with Cecil in the Best Buddies program that matched students with adults in the community with intellectual disabilities.

Bowers, who is a long-haul trucker, told officers that Jews were committing genocide and that he wanted them all to die, according to the charging document.

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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