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The foreign holiday Australians can DEFINITELY go on this year despite coronavirus border closures

Australians are being offered a unique opportunity to enjoy a foreign trip this summer, even with international travel being banned due to coronavirus restrictions.

Qantas have teamed with Antarctica Flights and up to bring Australians an awe-inspiring experience flying over the continent, but unfortunately – travellers can’t step foot on the ground. 

Keen travellers can book a seat on ‘the world’s most scenic flight’ with Qantas, a 13-hour round-trip to Antarctica, flying over the area’s vast and stunning landscape.

Those unique flights will start this summer on November 15, leaving from Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth.

Foreign travel has been banned since March 20, but Qantas has found a unique way to take Australians overseas (pictured, passengers arriving in Sydney from Melbourne on August 5)

The company's website explains that the flight takes approximately 12.5 hours depending on the city of origin (pictured, a flight with the company teaming up with Qantas)

The company’s website explains that the flight takes approximately 12.5 hours depending on the city of origin (pictured, a flight with the company teaming up with Qantas)

There are seven flights available in total. 

‘It really is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to visit Antarctica in a day,’ Bas Bosschieter, Antarctica Flights CEO, told 7news.com.au.

‘I personally think it’s the best answer to the question “What did you get up to on the weekend?” “Just popped down to Antarctica”.

‘Whilst it is very difficult for Australians to travel overseas at this time, our Antarctica Flights guests will be able to “visit” another continent in a day.’

The company’s website explains that the flight takes approximately 12.5 hours depending on the city of origin.

Antarctica experts will also be onboard the flight to talk about the environment and its history, giving passengers an insightful experience into the unique continent.

Within three hours of flying south of Australia, guests will start to see scatterings of ice following by mesmerising icebergs.

The flight over the land mass goes for three to four hours, before turning back to head home to Australia.

Australians have been stopped from travelling internationally since March 20 (pictured, passengers going into quarantine after arriving to Sydney from Melbourne on Saturday)

Australians have been stopped from travelling internationally since March 20 (pictured, passengers going into quarantine after arriving to Sydney from Melbourne on Saturday)

Antarctica Flights and Qantas have teamed up to bring Australians an awe-inspiring experience. However, there is a catch - travellers cannot step foot on the ground (stock image)

Antarctica Flights and Qantas have teamed up to bring Australians an awe-inspiring experience. However, there is a catch – travellers cannot step foot on the ground (stock image)

The cost of the flights start from $1,199 for economy while business class and deluxe seats will set travellers back an eye-watering $7,999.

But flights will be a little different this year due to coronavirus restrictions. 

Passengers and crew will be required to complete a health and safety declaration form and have their temperature checked before boarding.

Anyone with a temperate of 38°C or above will be denied access to the flight and given a credit.

There will be less movement on board and no check-in will be required at the airport, reducing contact with others. 

Prior to take-off everyone will be given a disposable mask, disinfectant wipes and hand sanitiser.

Australians returning from abroad are required to quarantine (pictured, airline passengers off a  flight from Melbourne wait in line to be checked off by NSW Police on Saturday)

Australians returning from abroad are required to quarantine (pictured, airline passengers off a  flight from Melbourne wait in line to be checked off by NSW Police on Saturday)

His comments came after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said he expected borders to reopen on January 1, 2021 and the first people to be allowed back would be international students

His comments came after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said he expected borders to reopen on January 1, 2021 and the first people to be allowed back would be international students

Qantas has also increased cleaning on the flights and provided additional head rests for when passengers switch seats. 

Australians have been stopped from travelling internationally since March 20, and anyone wishing to leave the country must be granted an exemption from the Department of Home Affairs.

Anyone returning home to Australia must quarantine in a hotel for two weeks and have been required to do so since March 22 – with the government no longer footing the bill. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison told A Current Affair on July 23 it was a challenging decision to make of when borders would reopen for international travel.

‘Right now the opportunity for large-scale travel beyond our borders is not foreseeable,’ he said.

Prior to take-off to Antarctica everyone will be given a disposable mask, disinfectant wipes and hand sanitiser. Qantas has also increased cleaning on the flights and provided additional head rests for when passengers switch seats (stock image)

Prior to take-off to Antarctica everyone will be given a disposable mask, disinfectant wipes and hand sanitiser. Qantas has also increased cleaning on the flights and provided additional head rests for when passengers switch seats (stock image)

However he expected that a travel bubble would open up with New Zealand by the end of the year – but Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has indicated this may no longer go ahead due to the Victorian outbreak.

His comments came after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said he expected borders to reopen on January 1, 2021 and the first people to be allowed back would be international students.

‘From January 1 to June 30, 2021, it is assumed that the travel ban is lifted, but that a two-week quarantine period is required of arrivals to Australia,’ a statement said.

‘This leads to the resumption of arrivals by temporary and permanent migrants, but at lower levels overall than normal.’  

Mr Frydenberg stressed at the time no policy decisions had been made. 

Anyone returning home to Australia must quarantine in a hotel for two weeks and have been required to do so since March 22 (pictured, people at Sydney airport preparing to fly to Queensland on July 31)

Anyone returning home to Australia must quarantine in a hotel for two weeks and have been required to do so since March 22 (pictured, people at Sydney airport preparing to fly to Queensland on July 31)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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